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Cuyahoga County


A federal judge gets his first look at the plan to reform Cleveland PD
The plan is a part of the consent decree agreed upon by the city and the federal government
by WKSU's M.L. SCHULTZE


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M.L. Schultze
 
The plan to be presented to Judge Solomon Oliver Jr. is address problems with training, use-of-force and community-police relations in Cleveland.
Courtesy of U.S. District Court
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Details on the crucial first step in the overhaul of the Cleveland Police Department will be submitted to a federal judge today.

WKSU’s M.L. Schultze says the emphasis will be on use of force and training.

LISTEN: Plan to revamp Cleveland's police department unveiled

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The plan is a first step toward implementing an agreement between the city of Cleveland and the U.S. Justice Department to address problems with training, use-of-force and community-police relations.

If federal Judge Solomon Oliver Jr. OK’s it – as expected – the focus the first year will include training the entire police department on a new use-of-force policy.

Matthew Barge is the federal monitor overseeing the consent decree. He says the goals for the first year of the five-year agreement are ambitious, and some important reforms will have to be held over for next year.

“Things related to stops of vehicles and people, a lot of stuff related to data systems for implementing a system to identify problematic performance trends among officers. Those are all things that are going to take time No. 1 and No. 2, there’s just not the band width in that plan to get to. It’s a very aggressive plant’s a very aggressive plan.”

Barge says one of the concerns is keeping the all-volunteer Community Police Commission established by the agreement from being overwhelmed by the task.


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