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Do Suburban Residents Pay Attention To Akron? Depends Who You Ask

14 hours ago
A photo of Ray Leach, owner of Leach's Meats and Sweets in Barberton
MIKE CARDEW / THE AKRON BEACON JOURNAL

Nancy Fay is Bath through and through. She lives on a family farm. She runs The Bake Shop in Ghent bakery. And she sits on the township zoning board.

She's lived in the community long enough that she can recall the resentment when Akron used to gobble up township land through annexation before a joint economic development agreement put an end to the bad blood.

Asked whether she cares about what happens in Akron, she replied, "Always." She understands that the health of Summit County's major city influences the health of the suburbs — and vice versa, she added.

 

photo of Duriya Dhinojwala, Michael Steel
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

Housing issues dominated a legal clinic over the weekend in Akron’s Middlebury neighborhood, with people seeking free help on how to handle everything from foreclosures to evictions.

The clinic was organized by Community Legal Aid and included more than a dozen attorneys who volunteered their time to work with close to 70 people, mostly from Summit County.

a photo of Dan Horrigan, Margo Sommerville, and Ilene Shapiro
JENNIFER CONN / WKSU

Akron Mayor Dan Horrigan kicked off his re-election campaign Friday, throwing his hat into the ring for a second four-year term. 

Horrigan's re-election campaign kickoff, held at his South Main Street headquarters, was attended by a small group of supporters.

a photo of Governor Mike DeWine and transportation and law enforcement officials
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Gov. Mike DeWine is trying a last ditch effort to push lawmakers back toward the gas tax increase that he originally proposed – which they slashed dramatically. 

Statehouse correspondent Karen Kasler reports he’s driving home his concerns about safety as the transportation budget goes to a conference committee.

Flanked by officials from ODOT and public safety, and holding a report listing Ohio’s 150 most dangerous intersections, DeWine thanked lawmakers for passing their transportation budgets – the House’s with a 10.7 cent gas tax increase and the Senate’s with 6 cents.

a photo of protestors in support of Medicaid expansion
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

As of last Friday, the state has federal permission to require 20 hours of work per week for many non-disabled people on Medicaid expansion.  

Work requirements will be imposed on people in Medicaid expansion who are under 50, aren’t caregivers, and aren’t in college or job training. Forty-one percent of the 613,000 Medicaid expansion recipients are working. Slightly less than that are exempt. And Medicaid director Maureen Corcoran says 18 percent – just over 109,000 people – will have to be assessed to see if they need to work more or are exempt.

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