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Summit County begins spraying for mosquitoes to head off West Nile virus
Spray has been adjusted to protect other species
by WKSU's LAUREN BLUE


Reporter
Lauren Blue
 
Stow and Monroe Falls are spraying for mosquitoes on Thursday night
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Summit County will be spraying for mosquitoes Thursday in Stow and Munroe Falls. Counties spray for mosquitoes when there is a large spike in the population or a mosquito tests positive for the West Nile virus.

Terry Tuttle is an environmental health supervisor for the Summit County Health Department. He says there is an increased potential for human cases of West Nile during the summer.

LISTEN: Tuttle on mosquito spraying

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“There is a cycle between birds and the culex mosquito. A culex mosquito bites an uninfected bird. Now that bird is infected. An uninfected mosquito bites that bird and then that mosquito now has West Nile.”

Tuttle says Summit County has phased out organophosphates in its sprays and now uses a bacteria-based spray that kills mosquitoes and gypsy moths but is safe for other species. Portage County sprayed for mosquitoes earlier this month. Cuyahoga County is not spraying yet but is monioring mosquito populations.

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