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Environment


CVNP looks at adding mountain biking to park usage
Park board reviewing environmental impact statement
by WKSU's JEFF ST. CLAIR


Reporter / Host
Jeff St. Clair
 
Mountain bike enthusiasts have long lobbied for access to the Cuyahoga Valley National Park. Bikers ususally create separate trails so as not to interfere with hikers.
Courtesy of Dirk Bormann, Flickr
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In The Region:

The new superintendent of the Cuyahoga Valley National Park says a decision on whether to allow mountain bikers on park trails is one of his top priorities. Stan Austin took over the 33,000 acre park in September. He formerly managed Yosemite and Glen Canyon National Parks. 

Local mountain bike groups have been pushing for years for greater access to the park, and Austin and the park board are reviewing public comments as part of an environmental impact study on their proposal. But unlike the previous administration, Austin is leaving the door open, "I want to work with these groups and make something happen for them. We won’t say bikes will be here in the park, but they’ll understand the steps to get to a decision.”

 
Federal law leaves it up to the superintendent’s discretion whether to provide mountain bike trails within the park based on the environmental impact analysis. The change would require rewriting the park’s guidance rules.
CVNP superintendent Stan Austin

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Related WKSU Stories

Northeast Ohio's mountain biking enthusiasts hack their way through brambles, brush, and red tape to build their trails in public parks
Wednesday, December 12, 2007

Listener Comments:

From what I've seen ,locally and abroad ,Equestrians do more damage than Mnt bikes. And for some reason they seem to be very reluctant to do any maintenance. We have an area locally that is maintained by bikers , no formal structure in place ,aprox.35mi. of trails. our worst Prob. is the motorized vehicles. no horses there . A local park allows horses but no motorized vehicles and there is more of an erosion problem there. Another local park I've been to twice ,a favorite of equestrians, and the trails where all but unridable . Not to mention Equestrians do not pick up after their animals


Posted by: Rich (Steubenville) on December 1, 2010 11:12AM
How about evaluating the trails, and opening ones that would have the least environmental impact, as well as potential for user conflict? Let the equestrians have their trails, we don't want to ride them anyway; furthermore CAMBA will build safe, sustainable trails for mtn. bikers with volunteer labor AT NO COST TO THE PARK OR TAXPAYERS! It's really a win-win situation.
Let's try to actually make Cleveland an attractive destination (and hometown!) It's these types of things we need in the area to attract health conscious, successful people. That will improve our quality of life, tax base and property values


Posted by: Bill (Euclid) on November 28, 2010 8:11AM
Can't be any worse impact than the great harm caused by horses on the trials. Hundreds of miles of trails for small number of horse owners that may use the park a couple of times a year is a complete misuse of the space that belongs to all of us and not only those with enough money to influence the park to prohibit mountain bike riders. Hopefully Mr. Austin will see the benefits of opening the trails to cyclists.


Posted by: Julie (Cleveland) on November 23, 2010 2:11AM
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