News Home
Quick Bites
News Archive
News Channel
Special Features
On AirNewsClassical
School Closings
WKSU Support
Funding for WKSU is made possible in part through support from the following businesses and organizations.

Area Agency on Aging 10B, Inc.

Akron Children's Hospital


For more information on how your company or organization can support WKSU, download the WKSU Media Kit.

(WKSU Media Kit PDF icon )

Donate Your Vehicle to WKSU

Programs Schedule Make A Pledge Member BenefitsFAQ/HelpContact Us
Arts and Entertainment

Picking the best of children's books
Author and Kent State collectors say instincts may be best guide

Web Editor
M.L. Schultze
1800 1196
Children's book author -- and converted architect -- David Macaulay said parents can often feel if a book is right for their children.
Courtesy of Gary Harwood
Download (WKSU Only)
One of the best ways to buy a children's book is to read a children's book. That advice comes from author and illustrator David McCaulay and Sylvia and Kenneth Marantz, who came to Kent today (Monday) to dedicate one of the most extensive collections of children's literature in the United States.
Click to Listen

Other options:
Windows Media / MP3 Download (7:38)

(Click image for larger view.)

Fierce animals. A pensive Rapunzel. A sea turtle with the world on his back. These are some of the characters found within the 21,000 children's books in Kenneth and Sylvia Marantz's collection that have found a new home at the Kent State University library. The 50-year collection of books, along with 2,000 posters of those books, were dedicated Monday by the Marantzes, whose critical eyes for children's literature have helped shape a collection that gives parents an alternative to the big-box bookstore approach. "You need guidance if you don't know the world of picture books," Sylvia Marantz said. "That's why we hate these great big stores where nobody there knows anything." The Marantzes recommend that besides consulting professional librarians to select children's literature, parent's use their own enjoyment of a children's book to gauge whether it's a good choice for their children. "Read the story yourself," Sylvia Marantz suggests. "Do you want to read it again? Because if you buy that for a kid, you're going to have to read it 150,000 times. You'd better like it!" Author and illustrator David McCaulay, whose books occupy a prominent corner of the Marantz collection, agrees that a parent's opinion of the book is an excellent indicator of whether a child will like it. He offered a set of questions parents can use to judge the literature: "Does it make you smile? Does it perhaps make you laugh? Does it take you back to another time in your life? The Marantzes look at David Wiesner's 2007 Caldecott Medal-winning children's book "Flotsam" as a prime example of the kind of book parents should be buying, citing the detail and imagination in its story and illustrations. "We didn't care who won the Caldecott that year; THAT was the book of the year," said Sylvia Marantz. "And when it won we felt very vindicated, because we thought it was absolutely top." "Flotsam" and the rest of the Marantz collection can be found in the third floor of the Kent State University library.
Listener Comments:

Reading books is a very efficient mean to gain knowledge especially for children. But now that innovation is very prevalent even in reading materials like internet, reading books becomes erratic and the study skill of children drop off. So as early as possible, kids must be accustomed to reading books like the undying work of Eric Carle, The Very Hungry Caterpillar. It will broaden the imagination of your kids and for sure the book will catch their interest and attention. The Very Hungry Caterpillar is a must read book.

Posted by: Jonah W. on March 27, 2009 4:05AM
Add Your Comment


E-mail: (not published, only used to contact you about your comment)


Page Options

Print this page

E-Mail this page / Send mp3

Share on Facebook

Stories with Recent Comments

Kasich campaign evokes dark images of a Trump presidency

Backers of legalizing marijuana in Ohio promise to be back in 2016
We should be aloud to grow more than 4 plants and not have to register with the state considering it will be a free market.

Akron says it's had no second thoughts about welcoming refugees
What business does Councilman Neal own on North Hill? I'd love to support him. I am so glad to have the refugees in our neighborhood. I have lived here for 25 ...

Scarborough says the University of Akron is trying to rebuild relationships
In order for the University of Akron to grow and become a desirable place for students across Ohio and elsewhere, it must address the crime problem in the Akron...

Ohio Sen. Cliff Hite wants to end pay-to-play sports fees at Ohio's schools
You can bet Hite and Husted will also rush to the rescue of the Academic Challenge team, the speech-and-debate squad, the Science Olympians and the chess club. ...

Ohio lawmakers consider new gun bills
States that have gun restrictions/cities have reduced gun violence is false. CHICAGO has some of the toughest gun laaws/restrictions but yet fun violence is off...

Cleveland's public transit system considers fare increase for 2016
I work with individuals with disabilities. Yes some of my folks need more help than the average person. As a whole, the group I work with however can manuver ju...

Community group sues to re-open part of Wadsworth hospital
My father was part of the founding group of citizens which started the "new" Wadsworth/Rittman Hospital. For some reason the leadership for the future of the ho...

The Cleveland Museum of Art presents painters who loved their gardens
brilliant masterpiece, Greetings from

Copyright © 2015 WKSU Public Radio, All Rights Reserved.

In Partnership With:

NPR PRI Kent State University

listen in windows media format listen in realplayer format Car Talk Hosts: Tom & Ray Magliozzi Fresh Air Host: Terry Gross A Service of Kent State University 89.7 WKSU | NPR.Classical.Other smart stuff. NPR Senior Correspondent: Noah Adams Living on Earth Host: Steve Curwood 89.7 WKSU | NPR.Classical.Other smart stuff. A Service of Kent State University