Election 2020

Credit Karen Kasler / Statehouse News Bureau

2020 is looking to be a pivotal year in politics.  But this year's elections are about much more than the race for the White House. WKSU, our colleagues at public radio stations across Ohio and the region and at NPR will bring you coverage of all the races from the national to the local level.

One way we want to make sure that you're connected with the process is to make sure the questions and concerns about the issues important to you are being addressed. Please let us know through the form below.

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The bill that made some changes across state law related to coronavirus also set a new ending for the Ohio primary, after polling places were shut down just hours before election day.

The Ohio Democratic Party has dropped its lawsuit over the postponed Election Day. 

photo of Democratic candidates for Summit County sheriff
SHANE WYNN

Tuesday night, the four democratic candidates for Summit County sheriff met for the one and only debate of their campaign.  The event, sponsored by the Akron Press Club took place at the Akron Summit County Public library and was moderated by WKSU’s M.L. Schultze.

LISTEN: March 10 Primaries Live Coverage

Mar 10, 2020
Summit County Board of Elections

Concerns about the spread of COVID-19 have led Ohio Secretary of State Frank LaRose to order that voting locations in retirement living or senior care facilities be moved for primary election day next Tuesday.To safeguard seniors, the Summit County Board of Elections moved 10 polling locations out of senior housing facilities, affecting nearly 11,000 voters.  

To inform voters, bright orange post cards were mailed to each voter in the affected precincts.

Election workers also delivered absentee ballots to the facilities, because manyof the  residents have 

Photo of President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump
LYDIA TAYLOR / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Thursday, Feb. 27:

photo of Sherrod Brown
/ WKSU

No matter who wins the nomination among Democrats running for president, one prominent Ohio Democrat believes it will all come down to highlighting contrasts for people.

Sherrod Brown says once the candidates stop fighting each other for the party nod, they can start pointing out that President Trump is working to undo all the things Democrats stand for—such as overtime pay for workers and expanded medical coverage for people in need.

a photo of Voting Machines
DAN KONIK / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Nearly all of Ohio's 88 counties are now considered compliant with an election security order issued by the Secretary of State last summer. That leaves a handful that aren’t, with two weeks until voters start casting early ballots for the March presidential primary.

Secretary of State Frank LaRose said 80 county boards of elections passed a 34 point security checklist, including background checks and training for election workers, migrating to .gov domains and installing intrusion detectors on servers.

photo of Sherrod Brown
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

Ohio’s Democratic Senator, Sherrod Brown, is not up for re-election this year. But during his appearance in Akron on Sunday, the conversation kept coming back to this fall’s election.

Bernie Sanders
SANDERS CAMPAIGN

Here are your morning headlines for Thursday, Jan. 23:

Ohioans are leaning Democratic ahead of the 2020 elections, according to a poll released this week. But the margin is slim and the state still could swing conservative before Election Day.

The poll, administered by Baldwin Wallace University, looked at four Midwestern states – Ohio, Michigan, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin – for opinions on the Trump Administration and issues including immigration, the economy and environment.

a photo of Frank LaRose
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Election officials around the state have been ordered to be on guard for the possibility of a cyber attack from Iran. Ohio's Secretary of State said there's been a spike of suspicious activity happening around the U.S.

Secretary of State Frank LaRose said boards of elections are preparing for early presidential primary voting starting next month, and meanwhile there's been an increase in suspicious cyber activity, some of which can be traced back to IP addresses from Iran.

photo of Dan Horrigan, Michael Bloomberg
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

Democratic Presidential Candidate Michael Bloomberg visited Ohio for the second time in a month on Wednesday night. And he picked up an endorsement in Akron.

Akron Mayor Dan Horrigan endorsed Bloomberg by saying, “we’re not looking for a savior; we’re looking for a partner in the Oval Office.”

photo of Connie Spencwer holding an impeachment sign
DAN KONIK / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Ohio voters have picked the winner in each presidential contest since 1960 and no Republican has won the White House without winning Ohio. As the 2020 presidential campaigns ramp up, Democrats are fine-tuning their message to voters as they try to take back Ohio.

photo of Frank LaRose
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

Ohio Secretary of State Frank LaRose says the state’s voting systems are secure and ready for 2020. But Jen Miller of the League of Women Voters is concerned about voter turnout.

Former New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg has made his first presidential campaign visit to Ohio. 

BILLY LIAR / CC

There is an idea, that there are five Ohios. They are not only segmented by region, but so much more. Industrial and agricultural. Urban, suburban and rural. Upper and lower income. Black and white. Looking at them together, they might just provide a better understanding for our country as a whole.

a photo of the Otterbein democratic debate stage
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Wednesday was the deadline for filing for Ohio’s March 17 primary ballot. And 14 candidates have filed for the Democratic primary. There will also be a Republican challenger to President Donald Trump on that ballot.

The first of the field of Democratic presidential candidates to file was Amy Klobuchar last month.  Since then, Tom Steyer, Bernie Sanders, Pete Buttigieg, Elizabeth Warren, Michael Bennet, Julian Castro, Joe Biden, Deval Patrick, Andrew Yang, Tulsi Gabbard, Cory Booker, Michael Bloomberg, and John Delaney have filed. Only Marianne Williamson didn’t file.

A 'thank you for voting sign'
CARTER ADAMS / WKSU

We’re less than a year away from the 2020 presidential election, and concern about Russian interference in the 2016 election persists. Have states, including Ohio, done everything they need to ensure that the vote next time will be safe and secure?

We spoke with Jen Miller, executive director of the League of Women Voters of Ohio. She says the state is in pretty good shape, but there’s still work to be done.

  

Ahead of the curve on cybersecurity

Ten candidates are taking the stage for the November Democratic Debate in Atlanta, amid public hearings in the impeachment inquiry into President Trump. NPR reporters will be providing fact checks and analysis throughout the debate. Follow along.

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Cuyahoga Valley National Park
LYDIA TAYLOR / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Tuesday, Nov. 19:

The group Ohioans for Gun Safety is making a push to get a popular gun control measure in front of voters.

According to the group’s spokesman Dennis Willard, they’re focused on one issue: getting mandatory universal background checks passed in Ohio.

Volunteers for the group spent Election Day at polling sites statewide, asking for signatures to put a new gun control law on the 2020 ballot.

A photo of Carol Dunitz in her Uncle Sam outfit
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

When political candidates come to town, they attract a lot of attention. People who sell shirts and other items set up shop to sell their wares. A professor from Washington D.C. stopped in Westerville Tuesday, carrying a sign to advertise her product – a musical about the 2020 election.

Carol Dunitz is walking around in a shiny Uncle Sam costume, carrying a sign to advertise her musical. Dunitz, who has a doctorate in speech and theatre, says her musical is about the 2020 election and includes songs that address a variety of issues.

students voting at machines
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

This is the time of year when students choose their school’s homecoming courts. And kids in one Franklin County high school are voting in a very official way.

In the gym of Westland High School, real voting machines are programmed with the names of homecoming candidates. Kids make their choices, print out the paper ballots and then take them to another machine that will tally them before Friday night’s football game.            

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