Coronavirus 4-1-1

WKSU, our public radio partners in Ohio and across the region and NPR are all continuing to work on stories on the latest developments with the coronavirus and COVID-19 so that we can keep you informed.

The Ohio Department of Health updates its numbers every afternoon on the spread of COVID-19. As of Tuesday, June 2, 2020 the state reports 36,350 cases of COVID-19, 2,258 people have died from the coronavirus disease and 6,176 have been hospitalized. These numbers reflect inclusion of probable cases, as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has encouraged states to now include. The state will provide both numbers on its key metrics page. The state has created a  dashboard to provide people with more data on the outbreak. 

The state has been tracking trends over a three week period.
Credit OHIO DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

  

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Confirmed COVID-19 Cases and Deaths in Ohio

Map credit: Sue Zake

This map will be updated daily following the release of new data from the Ohio Department of Health.

A photo of Children's Akron campus
AKRON CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL

Health care providers locally and around the country are seeing a steep decline in the number of children being brought in for well visits.

Akron Children’s Hospital stopped offering well visits for children over the age of 3 in late March. Over the last two weeks it’s begun returning to full capacity.

Ohio leaders are condemning threats of violence made against Ohio House Minority Leader Emilia Sykes and her father, state Sen. Vernon Sykes, last weekend.

Tourism Losses Will Have 'Tremendous Impact' On Columbus Economy

May 27, 2020

Columbus has lost about $145 million in tourist spending due to the coronavirus pandemic.

With most of Ohio’s businesses allowed to open up, experts who’ve worked with the state on the modeling it used to create its COVID-19 policies are evaluating their predictions for what’s ahead.

A Republican-backed bill to prohibit communities from banning plastic bags and other disposable containers passed the Senate on a mostly party line vote, after a significant change related to the COVID-19 pandemic.

When courts in the Justice Center begin reopening to the public June 1, Northeast Ohioans will find a very different courthouse from the one that closed its doors a few months ago.

According to an order issued by Administrative Judge Brendan Sheehan, visitors will be required to wear masks and be screened for COVID-19 symptoms.

photo of Clean Committed Undefeated poster
DESTINATION CLEVELAND

Starting next week, Destination Cleveland will unveil a marketing campaign designed to re-open the city's restaurants, hotels, and tourist attractions.

Rubber Bowl beside Derby Downs
TIM RUDELL / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, May 27:

Arturo Pardavila III / Wikimedia Commons

Normally this time of year, Progressive Field is filled with cheering Cleveland Indians fans and fireworks. Now because of the pandemic, Major League Baseball players and owners are locked in contentious negotiations to start the season around July 4 without fans. WKSU sports commentator Terry Pluto says the baseball blues are setting in.

Sanitizing large public spaces in the age of the coronavirus is coming down to drones. It may be a way to get fans in the stands sooner. It also could be an effective way to transport a vaccine to the masses once one becomes available. These and other applications have researchers scrambling to find pandemic-era drone applications.

Northeast Ohio’s community health centers are preparing to ramp up coronavirus testing efforts, with a focus on minority and high-risk populations.

The City of Cleveland expected to increasingly enforce restrictions on businesses as the state further reopens following the coronavirus lockdown, Mayor Frank Jackson said in a Friday press conference.

Residents can file a complaint with the city if they suspect a business is violating social distancing or other restrictions. The city will reach out to the business by phone, Jackson said, as well as send a letter notifying the business of the complaint.

Now, a copy of the complaint will also be sent to the Ohio Department of Health, Jackson said.

COVID-19 Led To Shut Down Of Some Addiction Services

May 26, 2020

The isolation and stress brought on by COVID-19 have been particularly difficult for people fighting drug addiction.

When Ohio shut down in March to slow the spread of the coronavirus, nonprofits that offer services to people with substance use issues had to change the way they operate to keep the virus at bay.

MetroHealth, which operates an opioid safety office, also had to limit some services said Kelly Cioletti.

“With COVID 19 happening the way it did ... access to treatment, detox, all of that shut down,” Cioletti said.

Help covering rent and mortgage payments is coming to small businesses in Mentor under a new grant program designed to help reopen the local economy.

The Mentor Small Business Restart Program is focusing on small, local storefronts that had no opportunity to collect revenue during the shutdown, said Mentor’s Director of Economic Development and International Trade Kevin Malecek.

COVID-19 closed down the March primary election, and lawmakers extended the absentee ballot deadline to late April.  Voter rights groups are asking state lawmakers to reform voting laws now, to avoid confusion before the November election. But they are not necessarily on the same page when it comes to which reforms should be made. 

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