workforce training

a photo of Husted and DeWine
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Gov. Mike DeWine has signed a second workforce-related bill in as many days. This one allows his Office of Workforce Transformation to create a one-stop shop for credentials and certificate programs that can be earned by workers and recognized by employers.

Lt. Gov. Jon Husted directs the Office of Workforce Transformation, and says this will help businesses fill open positions and help people find training to get those jobs.

Small Businesses Facing a Worker Shortage

Oct 2, 2019
a photo of a technical worker
CREATIVE COMMONS

Small businesses in Ohio are struggling to find workers according to the National Federation of Independent Business. They surveyed small businesses and found that nationally a quarter of them are having trouble finding skilled workers who can pass drug tests.

In Ohio, three quarters of the business owners who responded said they were having trouble finding workers. NFIB Director Roger Geiger says Ohio is facing a crisis.

 

photo of computer
SHUTTERSTOCK / SHUTTERSTOCK

An Akron startup is looking to boost the skills of local tech employees.

DriveIT co-founder Ian Schwarber says the company will offer face-to-face courses ranging from data science and programming to classes on team management and business intelligence taught by local professionals.

Schwarber likens it to a full-circuit workout that can help employees broaden their skill sets. He refers to the workspace as a "gym" and calls the individual sessions "workouts."

photo of Greater Cleveland Partnership logo
GREATER CLEVELAND PARTNERSHIP

At the Greater Cleveland Partnership’s annual meeting this week, the regional chamber of commerce outlined its goals for the next few years. The focus will be on the workforce and on development outside downtown.

Greater Cleveland Partnership CEO Joe Roman says his organization has been focused on real estate and the city’s public schools.

“The last five-to-seven years has probably seen as much improvement in many of those areas as the city has probably seen in the last three or four generations,” he said.