voting

The state’s Republican chief elections officer and Ohio Democrats continue to battle over installing additional drop boxes where absentee voters could deposit their ballots if they’re concerned about the security and speed of mailing them in this fall. 

illustration of coronavirus
ANGELA HSIEH / NPR

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, Feb. 19:

photo of Frank LaRose at a podium
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The state’s chief elections officer is criticizing President Trump and other key figures for sharing rumors and false information related to voting, recently about the Iowa caucuses but going all the way back to the 2016 election. This comes as Ohioans prepare to start early voting in two weeks for the presidential primary in March.

Republican Secretary of State Frank LaRose said posting conspiracy theories about voting that cast doubt on the fairness and accuracy of U.S. elections shouldn’t be tolerated – no matter where it comes from.

photo of a voting machine
DAN KONIK / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Ohio’s top elections official says he’s still bothered that only a little over a quarter of the state’s registered voters cast ballots in last week’s election. He thinks changing the maps for elected officials’ districts will help get voters more interested.

Secretary of State Frank LaRose says the state has made it easy for people to vote, but the turnout last week was still too low. He says people tend to turn out more for hotly contested races. 

a photo of vote buttons
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU

Here are the morning headlines for Monday, Oct. 7:

Photo of a person vaping
LINDSAY FOX / WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, September 25:

students voting at machines
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

This is the time of year when students choose their school’s homecoming courts. And kids in one Franklin County high school are voting in a very official way.

In the gym of Westland High School, real voting machines are programmed with the names of homecoming candidates. Kids make their choices, print out the paper ballots and then take them to another machine that will tally them before Friday night’s football game.            

WKSU

After combing through more than 2,000 submissions, Ohio Secretary of State Frank LaRose announced the three finalists of the ‘I Voted’ sticker contest.

Young Ohioans from all over the state submitted their designs, but the three finalists are all high school seniors. One is Ian from Hawken School in Cuyahoga County.

early voting 2012
ROMULUS MILHALTEANU / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Friday, April 26: 

Crowd
Jo Ingles / Statehouse News

Here are your morning headlines for Tuesday, Feb. 12:

Tim Ryan, U.S. Congressman from Ohio
WOSU

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, December 5:

Prayer vigil at the Lordstown plant
TIM RUDELL / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Tuesday, December 4:

photo of early voters in Stark County
WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, November 21:

picture of May 4th Visitor's Center, Kent State University
Kent State University

Mindy Farmer is the director of the May 4 Visitors Center and an assistant professor of history.  Previously she served as the founding education specialist at the federal non-partisan Richard Nixon Presidential Library and Museum where she oversaw the Library's education and public programming.  

She holds a doctorate from The Ohio State University. 

Secretary of State Casts His Early Ballot

Oct 16, 2018
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Early voting has been under way for a week, and the number of registered voters is the highest it’s been in a decade.

Many voters are opting to vote early through absentee ballot. That includes one major statewide official.

Secretary of State Jon Husted visited the Franklin County Board of Elections to drop off his absentee ballot. He says Ohio takes an all-of-the-above approach to voting, which means in-person on Election Day, in-person at your local board of election, through the mail or by drop-off.

a photo of vote buttons
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Thursday, Oct. 11:

photo of Ohio voters
DAN KONIK / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Voting rights groups say they are getting reports of misinformation and misleading text messages.

Mike Brickner with the group All Voting is Local said some voters in the 12th Congressional District are getting misleading messages in the days leading up to Tuesday’s special election.

“They’ve received anonymous text messages into their phones saying their polling place has changed, causing them to kind of go into a panic,” he said.

Photo of people voting
DAN KONIK / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Thousands of Ohioans are expected to go to the polls Tuesday to cast their ballots in the primary for governor, U.S. Senator, Congress and state lawmakers as well as a plan to change the redistricting process – and there are nearly 500 local levies and other issues on the ballot.

More than 128,000 Ohioans have already voted early. If you didn't, you’ll have to take care of business at your local precinct. You can find that location on the secretary of state’s website or by calling your local board of elections.

photo of John Husted
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

President Donald Trump has signed an executive order disbanding the commission he created to investigate what he claimed were millions of fraudulent votes in the 2016 election. Ohio’s chief elections officer wasn’t a fan of the Election Integrity Commission to begin with.

Ohio voting sticker
STATE OF OHIO

Ohioans will be going to the polls tomorrow to vote on victim’s rights, drug prices and many local candidates and issues. 

Issue 1 is the state constitutional amendment known as Marsy’s Law, which would put victims' rights in the Ohio constitution.

Photo of Jon Husted
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security has reached out to elections officials in Ohio and 20 other states, which have confirmed they were targeted by hackers during the 2016 election. Statehouse correspondent Karen Kasler reports Ohio’s chief elections official said he thinks the story isn't as shocking as it may seem.

photo of Jon Husted
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The U.S. Supreme Court has decided to not hear an argument from an Ohio group that claims the state’s top elections official is wrongfully tossing out ballots.

US Department of Homeland Security logo
WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

The federal Department of Homeland Security is calling voting machines “critical infrastructure” because of the threat of hacking. But Ohio’s Secretary of State wonders whether that designation will bring changes.

Jon Husted said he’s not sure what this designation from Homeland Security means and whether it's an expansion of the federal government's authority. So he wants information in writing.

photo of John Husted
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Voting was much smoother in Election 2016 than in previous years. There were no court challenges to keep the polls open and no major technical or security issues reported.

But Secretary of State Jon Husted said he was watching turnout carefully.

“You also have the issue with two candidates at the top of the ticket that weren’t very popular among most Ohioans, so I was concerned. But in the end, early voting ended up setting a record and then turnout was pretty robust.”

photo of sample presidential ballot
SUMMIT COUNTY BOARD OF ELECTIONS

It is a felony to take a picture of your ballot in Ohio. Some lawmakers plan to sponsor a bill to allow voters to take those pictures if they want. But there’s a reason that law exists.

Attorney General spokesman Dan Tierney says Ohio’s law against taking pictures of ballots was not meant to stifle free speech of voters.

“It was intended to protect voters who may try to intimidate them to vote a certain way.”

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