voter rolls

a photo of voters
DAN KONIK / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Ohio’s Secretary of State is in the process of removing more than 200,000 voter registrations thought to be improperly on the voter rolls. But advocates say some people should not be removed.

The Director of the League of Women Voters of Ohio, Jen Miller, said her own name is on a list of voters in Franklin County that was flagged to go through the process of being confirmed as a registered voter. And she said there’s no reason for it.

A photo of voters lined up outside of a voting center in Franklin County
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Some Ohio voters who had previously been removed from the voting rolls for inactivity will be able to cast ballots in any election through 2022. A new agreement will allow them to vote provisionally.

Freda Levenson of the ACLU of Ohio says it’s a big win for voters removed from the rolls for not voting and not responding to requests to update their registrations over a six-year period. 

Sherrod Brown speaking
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Ohio’s top Democratic elected official is fighting the state’s process when it comes to scratching voters off the rolls. The new bill is in response to a U.S. Supreme Court ruling allowing Ohio’s voter-roll cleanup process. 

A bill from U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown says no voter should be kicked off the rolls just because they failed to cast a vote or respond to a notification letter.

That’s the process in Ohio now, a process that takes six years before someone loses their registration.

photo of voting signs
DAN KONIK / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The Secretary of State says no voters will be removed from the rolls before the November election, in spite of the U.S. Supreme Court ruling upholding Ohio’s process of deleting inactive voters’ registrations.

Secretary of State Jon Husted sent a letter to all 88 county boards of elections, telling them to take no action until further notice on maintaining voter rolls, which he says has been on hold since the lawsuit was filed in 2016.

photo of Joe Helle video
YOUTUBE/CLEVELAND.COM

The U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments today in a case challenging Ohio’s controversial method for maintaining its voter rolls, and the major players from the case were there to hear it.

Photo of the Cleveland Clinic's Miller Family Pavillion
CLEVELAND CLINIC

Here are your morning headlines for Tuesday, Sept. 26th:

photo of purged voters court ruling
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The U.S. Justice Department has taken an unusual move. It reversed its position on a high-profile US Supreme Court case involving Ohio’s process for maintaining voter rolls.

U.S. Justice Department attorneys have filed a friend of the court brief, saying Ohio can legally remove voters flagged as inactive or those who have failed to respond to recent mailings.

photo of Jon Husted
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals has ruled the process Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted is using to remove voters from the rolls is illegal. 

Husted’s office has removed nearly 1.4 million voter registrations from the voter rolls. Some were dead, were thought to have moved or were inactive voters.

Jon Husted
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

A federal judge has ruled that Secretary of State Jon Husted can continue to remove voters from Ohio’s rolls. 

The Republican Secretary of State has removed about a million people from the rolls since 2011. The court says he can continue the practice, which Husted says follows state and federal law and removes dead, inactive and duplicate voters.

Photo of Jon Husted
JO INGLES / OHIO PUBLIC RADIO

The state is being sued over the way Secretary of State Jon Husted is handling the removal of voters from the state’s voting rolls. 

The Ohio American Civil Liberties Union’s Freda Levinson says Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted is using illegal criteria to purge voters.

“Under federal law, it is not permissible to cancel a voter for exercising their right not to vote,” Levinson said.