U.S. Supreme Court

Diebold HQ
TIM RUDELL / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Thursday, July 4:

The Supreme Court ruling that blocked the citizenship question for the 2020 census won’t have much impact on local preparations for next year’s count, local officials say.

But they’re hoping it convinces people to participate in the tally.

“We know the Census Bureau has to get the questionnaire complete,” said Simeon Best, who is heading the Complete Count Committee for Cuyahoga County. “But for our efforts, we’re still pushing forward to reach out to everyone, because we want everyone counted.” 

a photo of Representative Emilia Sykes
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The state will ask the US Supreme Court to delay an order to draw a new Congressional district map.

A panel of three federal judges that the map is unconstitutionally gerrymandered has denied a request from the state to delay their order to draw a new map by next month. 

Photo of the Old Stagecoach Inn
GOOGLE MAPS

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, April 10:

a photo of computer on a table
BART EVERSON / FLICKR/CREATIVE COMMONS

State lawmakers have said they want an income tax cut in the upcoming budget, but Gov. Mike DeWine wants them to invest big money in children’s initiatives and the opioid crisis. That has some looking in and out of state for money so they can do both. 

photo of downtown Canton, Ohio
TIM RUDELL / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Friday, January 8:

photo of early voters in Stark County
WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, November 21:

picture of execution bed
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The U.S. Supreme Court says it won’t hear a challenge to Ohio’s death penalty law in a case involving a convicted murderer and rapist from Marion.

The Supreme Court chose not to review a ruling from the Ohio Supreme Court in April that upheld the death sentence for 54-year-old Maurice Mason. Mason’s team claimed Ohio’s death penalty law had the same problems as Florida’s, which the high court had ruled unconstitutional. 

BILL RINEHART / WVXU

One of the most vocal supporters of Brett Kavanaugh's Supreme Court confirmation campaigned in Cincinnati last night.

South Carolina Republica Sen. Lindsey Graham brought up the Capitol Hill fight to fire up Republicans ahead of next week's midterm elections.

Graham told the crowd Republican and Democratic senators alike used to judge nominees based on qualifications.

photo of Cleveland Hopkins Airport
NICK CASTELE / WCPN

Here are your morning headlines for Tuesday, October 23:

photo of hospital hallway
SFAM PHOTO / SHUTTERSTOCK

Here are your morning headlines for Thursday, October 18:

U.S. Senate

Ohio’s senators split Friday on whether to move forward to a vote on Brett Kavanaugh's appointment to the United States Supreme Court. Senator Sherrod Brown voted against proceeding. Senator Rob Portman voted in favor of ending the debate and moving to the final vote on Kavanaugh’s confirmation. In comments on the senate floor Thursday night, Portman affirmed support for Kavanaugh, and talked about the country moving forward.

JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The controversy over conservative federal judge Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation to a lifetime position on the U.S. Supreme Court has left many people wondering how the perceived shift in that bench will affect them. LGBTQ Ohioans are concerned.

Chad Griffin with the Human Rights Campaign says the message from his group to LGBTQ voters in Ohio is clear – put the brakes on the Trump administration now.

Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh and the woman who has accused him of sexually assaulting her in high school, Christine Blasey Ford, testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Thursday, September 27 beginning at 10am. We will bring you live NPR coverage of the hearing on the WKSU stations.  You'll also be able to watch the proceeding here live.

Updated at 11:53 p.m. ET

Christine Blasey Ford, who has accused Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh of sexual assault when they were in high school, rejected an ultimatum given by Senate Judiciary Chairman Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa.

Sen. Rob Portman (R-Ohio) introduced U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh at a contentious hearing of the Senate Judiciary Committee on Tuesday.

photo of the U.S. Supreme Court
WIKIMEDIA

The U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee is holding confirmations hearings this week for Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh.  NPR and WKSU will bring you complete coverage of the hearings.  You can listen to them on our HD4 News stream at the top of our website, on the WKSU app on your smart phone or on you HD Radio.

You can also watch it here:

Supreme Court building, Washington, DC
Architect of the Capital website

Ohio’s Sen. Sherrod Brown said that after meeting with Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh this week, he still has deep concerns.

Brown said Kavanaugh’s decisions as a lower court judge showed a pattern of ruling in favor of corporations and against labor and consumer interests. Nothing in his meeting with the nominee allayed his concern.

Brown also said he found it disingenuous that Kavanaugh shifted his position on presidential power since being an advisor to the Republican effort to impeach President Bill Clinton.

WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Friday, July 13: 

Photo of the Smucker House
TIM RUDELL / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Tuesday, July 10:

Generic photo of people voting
MARYLAND GOV PICS / FLICKR

Even though the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that Ohio’s disputed six-year voter roll maintenance process is constitutional, no voters will be removed from the rolls till after the November election. There’s now a plan on how to go forward with voter removal after that.

photo of Senate President Larry Obhof
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The U.S. Supreme Court ruling on union laws caused a national stir and sent a shock wave to labor groups in Ohio.

Some Republican lawmakers have been trying to pass bills around unions and collective bargaining for years. According to the top Senate leader, now they no longer have to.

Several so-called “Right to Work” bills have been proposed since a collective bargaining reform law was overturned in 2011.

These are measures that would make it illegal to require an employee to pay union dues in order to work.

U.S. Supreme Court building
Wiki Commons

The U.S. Supreme Court voted 5-to-4 Wednesday that state government employees who decline to join a union can no longer be made to pay a share of the union’s cost of negotiating contracts.  

The decision reverses one from 1977 --Abood v. Detroit Board of Eduction--which said, while unions can’t charge non-members dues, they can levy “agency fees” because union-negotiated contracts benefit non-union workers, too.

photo of the U.S. Supreme Court
WIKIMEDIA

More than 100,000 Ohio teachers who are members of their local unions could soon feel the impact of a U.S. Supreme Court decision Wednesday.

The 5-4 decision ends the practice of charging nonunion workers’ agency fees in union workplaces in the public sector. Those fees cover the cost of negotiating contracts or representing employees in grievances, services unions offer to all employees in the workplaces where they operate.

Ohio's Congressional map based on the 2010 Census
SECRETARY OF STATE

In light of recent U.S. Supreme Court decisions on gerrymandering in two other states, voting-rights groups have revised their lawsuit over how Ohio draws its congressional maps. 

Pages