University Hospitals

a photo of Frank LaRose
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Here are your morning headlines for September 15, 2020:

A photo of Re'Ona O'Neal's ultrasound.
RE'ONA O'NEAL

COVID-19 disproportionately impacts black families, causing a wide range of concerns among people already facing racial unrest, bias in health care, and an infant mortality rate at least twice the rate of white infants statewide. 

A photo of Cheryl Martin holding a picture of her son, Colin Martin.
SMITHBERGER PHOTOGRAPHY

A mom who understands the pain of losing an infant shares her grief to help families in Cuyahoga County, where black babies are nearly four times less likely to survive to their first birthdays as white babies.

Bias in healthcare may have contributed to the death of her baby.

If your allergies are worse this season, you might blame it on the coronavirus pandemic.

University Hospitals allergist Dr. Sam Friedlander said it’s possible that allergies are worse now because people stayed home all spring to avoid the virus.

Friedlander said when people have new exposures to allergies, they have a dramatic increase in symptoms.

That means less time outside during the spring while people stayed home could have an impact.

a photo of a protester in Cleveland.
TAYLOR HAGGERTY / WCPN

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, June 3:

Updated: 5:20 p.m., Thursday, May 14, 2020 

University Hospitals is using a new protective tool to conduct COVID-19 tests.

The hospital system’s innovation department, UH Ventures, partnered with the Manufacturing Advocacy and Growth Network (MAGNET) to design and develop innovative COVID-19 testing booths. Workers administer the tests through arms-length gloves attached to a barrier on the booth.

This could speed up the testing process, as the workers no longer need to change personal protective equipment in between each test.

Cleveland-Area Hospitals Use Antibody Testing To Research COVID-19

May 5, 2020

Updated: 4 p.m. on  Friday May 1, 2020

Two northeast Ohio health systems, University Hospitals and MetroHealth, are using antibody tests on frontline employees to better understand COVID-19 and if it’s possible to become re-infected with the virus.  

University Hospitals plans to test about 10,000 employees, nearly half its staff, for the coronavirus to see if they have developed antibodies, said Dr. Robert Salata, chair of the department of medicine at UH.

Gov. Mike DeWine announced Wednesday a partial rollback on his ban on elective medical procedures in Ohio — the same day University Hospitals announced staff pay cuts. Less than 24 hours later, UH also said it plans to shut down some emergency services by the end of the month.

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Here are your morning headlines for Thursday, April 23: 

COVID-19 trends in Ohio.
OHIO DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

Here are your morning headlines for Friday, April 17:

Two hospital systems in Cleveland are offering alternative housing for employees who are working during the COVID-19 pandemic and are concerned about possibly exposing their families to the virus. 

University Hospitals is using a Case Western Reserve University residence hall to temporarily house workers. UH spokesperson George Stamatis said employees at UH Cleveland Medical Center are eligible to stay at the dorm for free for up to four days.

"The lodging is available to all employees of UH Cleveland Medical Center, not only clinical staff," Stamatis said.

Cleveland Clinic and Case Western Reserve University are converting their new health education campus into a 1,000 bed hospital space, to help handle the expected surge of COVID-19 patients, said Dr. Ed Sabanegh, president of the clinic’s main campus.

Clinic officials have been using scientific models to predict the number of patients that may need care and the number of hospital beds needed, said Sabanegh.

Medications
TIM RUDELL / WKSU

University Hospitals is leading a new clinical trial to test whether an oral spray produced by Cleveland-based company ARMS Pharmaceutical can help prevent the coronavirus.

The trial’s principal investigator Dr. Robert Salata said the focus of the trial is on health care workers because they are becoming infected at a higher rate.

“We really feel strongly that this is a very important thing that we’re trying to do in terms of prevention,” he said.

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SHUTTERSTOCK

Here are your morning headlines for Thursday, April 2:

University Hospitals is approved to begin clinical trials of an antiviral drug that could possibly help treat COVID-19 patients. UH will receive the antiviral Saturday.

Here are your morning headlines for Friday, March 30:

Voting booth at a polling place
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Tuesday, March 17:

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KENT STATE UNIVERSITY

Here are your morning headlines for Monday, March 16:

photo of Robert Wyllie, Robyn Strosaker
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

The news of how the coronavirus is affecting Northeast Ohio is changing daily. One week ago, only a few dozen tests had been conducted in the state. And schools, bars, restaurants and sporting events were all operating as usual. As of this past weekend, all of that has changed. 

 a photo of Gov Mike DeWine
WBNS-TV

Restaurants and bars across the state shut down Sunday night under an order by Gov. Mike DeWine to stop the spread of COVID-19. 

DeWine will also sign an executive order to help the unemployed affected by the pandemic. The order will change Ohio's unemployment law to enable workers who do not have paid-leave benefits to access unemployment benefits.

There is currently a one-week delay for people awaiting unemployment benefits. This order will waive that delay and will be effective immediately. For more details, click here

a photo of Lori Criss
THE OHIO CHANNEL

Health officials have confirmed 26 cases of COVID-19 in the state, which is 10 more cases than Friday. At least 11 are in Cuyahoga County and two are in Summit County. 

At a press conference Saturday, Gov. Mike DeWine focused on individuals struggling with addiction and mental health challenges. 

a photo of doctors
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

Beginning at 11 a.m. Saturday Cleveland Clinic patients will be able to have a drive-through COVID-19 test with a doctor's order. 

The Clinic and University Hospitals (UH) announced Saturday morning that they are partnering to offer the service to the community.

Drive through testing with a doctor's order will be available Monday for UH patients. 

The testing site will be open seven days a week from 11 a.m.-7 p.m. It is located in the garage of the jointly-owned W. O. Walker Building in University Circle, 10524 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland.

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UNIVERSITY OF AKRON

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, March 11:

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Here are your morning headlines for Thursday, March 5: 

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