unemployment compensation

State officials say they are putting every resource they have into ramping up Ohio's unemployment compensation website. The site has been crashing due to the massive influx in requests.

cybersecurity illustration
PASKO MAXSUM / SHUTTERSTOCK

Ohio has a new tool to detect bogus claims by the few people who try to scam the state for unemployment checks each year. 

The state uses new hire reports from employers, cross matches with prison and jail records and other government documents to try to detect fraud. Bret Crowe with the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services says it’s adding another tool by partnering with a national data hub.

“By searching for matching data used in fraud claims in other states,” Crowe said. “So, we are tied into a national database of unemployment claims.”

Photo of Cliff Rosenberger joined by business and labor leaders
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The new House speaker says now that his seven-week-long battle to get elected is over, it’s time to focus on several big issues. Among those:  an effort to reform the state’s unemployment compensation fund. 

It’s been more than a year and half since top House leaders joined business and labor groups, pledging to shore up the fund that pays benefits to laid off workers.

As Republican House Speaker Ryan Smith explains, the state will go into debt to the feds unless a fix is passed.

Andy Chow / Statehouse News Bureau

The bill to change the way money is put into the fund the state uses to pay benefits to unemployed workers is taking another step forward this week. But it has yet to pick up support from labor or business groups.

Republican leaders in the House say the clock is ticking for lawmakers to do something about the state’s unemployment compensation fund, which they say would dry up quickly in the event of a recession.

photo of Cliff Rosenberger and Ohio Representatives
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

After more than a year of negotiations, a fix to shore up the fund that Ohio uses to pay benefits to jobless workers is no closer to reality.

Kirk Schuring
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

A controversial bill intended to shore up the fund the state uses to pay unemployment benefits might be moving forward soon. The bill’s sponsor says it’s a high wire act between labor and business groups.

The plan would require employers to pay more into the unemployment compensation fund while also requiring some buy-in from workers. This is all an attempt to bring the fund to solvency ahead of any impending recession.

photo of Larry Obhof talking to reporters
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

There’s about a month left for legislators to get anything done before the new year. As Statehouse correspondent Andy Chow reports, there’s one issue that the top Senate leader specifically wants to move forward in that time.

Senate President Larry Obhof says it’s time to pass a bill that reforms the state’s unemployment compensation program.

The House and Senate have been trying to work up a plan that would bring the fund that the state uses to pay jobless benefits to solvency. And while Obhof acknowledges it’s a polarizing issue, he says it’s time to get it moving.

Photo of House Republican leaders
Andy Chow / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Ohio is trying to stabilize its unemployment benefit fund, which went deeply in debt to the feds in 2008,. And both business and labor leaders agree it needs an overhaul. But they have mixed feelings over a plan state lawmakers are considering.

Republican Rep. Kirk Schuring took the ideas he heard in a working group among labor and business leaders and put them into a bill.

He notes both sides have things they like and don’t like in it.

Picture of Unemployment Compensation
Andy Chow

The state seems to be one step closer to a plan that would make changes to the way the state funds the program that pays benefits to unemployed workers. As Statehouse correspondent Andy Chow reports, the next step is getting both labor and business to approve the idea.

 

 

 

Republican House Speaker Pro Tempore Kirk Schuring says he’s put together a plan that could save the unemployment compensation fund from taking another hit like the one in 2008 when the state had to borrow billions of dollars from the feds.

 

photo of Lisa Hamler-Fugitt
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Ohio lawmakers are trying to agree on how to shore up the fund that pays jobless benefits to unemployed workers. Several advocacy groups say the lame-duck efforts still threaten people during their most vulnerable time.

A laid-off worker would be able to get unemployment checks from 26 weeks to 20 weeks based on a new bill proposed in the House and Senate. That’s up from a previous bill that would have cut the time to 12 weeks.

The bill would also require more businesses to pay more into the fund.