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Editor's Note:  This story was originally published on December 20, 2017

Ohio’s 4th Congressional District isn’t the longest in the state. Nor the most convoluted. Nor does it have the most disenfranchised voters. But it has the distinction of being near the top in all three categories -- and of being home to one of the most liberal communities in the country represented by one of the most conservative members of Congress. In the third part of our series “Gerrymandering: Shading the lines,” WKSU’s M.L. Schultze travels the 4th – a study of contrasts from south to north.

a photo of the video game art exhibit
MARK AREHART / WKSU

From Atari to Xbox, the world of video games has grown from arcade subculture into a multi-billion dollar industry. An exhibition of video game artwork—both inspired by and created in virtual worlds—is now on display at the Akron Art Museum. On this week's State of the Arts, we delve into the landscape of "Open World: Video Games and Contemporary Art."

Erik Drost / Flickr

The Cleveland Browns will be looking to build momentum as they return to the field Thursday against rival Pittsburgh. The Browns (3-6) snapped a four-game losing streak with a win on Sunday over Buffalo. WKSU sports commentator Terry Pluto says the Steelers have had a surprising season with a 5-4 record despite losing their star quarterback.

Erik Drost / Wikimedia Commons

The Cavs are off to a surprising start with a 4-6 record 10 games into the season. The team won just 19 games last year. WKSU sports commentator Terry Pluto said the team has had a relatively easy schedule to start. Still, he says many things are starting to gel, including the team's vision for life post-LeBron James.

a photo of Mario Andretti
MARK AREHART / WKSU

Racing legend Mario Andretti was on hand as Bridgestone America offered a sneak peek Monday of its new race tire production facility in Akron.

A stock photo of stethoscope and chart.
PIXABAY

The state is starting the process that will eventually require thousands of Ohioans in Medicaid expansion to work 20 hours a week or lose their benefits, after getting permission from the federal government earlier this year. But advocates for Medicaid expansion still have big concerns about how this will work and how many people will be kicked out of the program.

Ohio Medicaid Director Maureen Corcoran said no one’s just going to get a letter saying they’ve lost their health care through Medicaid expansion.

photo of Kmart Tallmadge
SARAH TAYLOR / WKSU

The closing of the last seven Kmarts in Ohio should serve as a sign to other retailers about what they need to do to stay competitive.

david cooperrider
JEFF ST.CLAIR / WKSU

Cleveland’s greatest export may not be world-class healthcare, auto parts, or even LeBron James, it might be a management philosophy.

Appreciative Inquiry was invented at Case Western Reserve University three decades ago and has become a transformative tool for companies and organizations around the world.

The process was used recently to help create a new vision for Cleveland.

In this week’s Exploradio, we look into the science of positive planning.

photo of Daniel Hamilton
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

MetroHealth is opening a permanent clinic Tuesday at the LGBT Community Center of Greater Cleveland – specifically to treat LGBTQ patients.

SUBMITTED PHOTO

Voters in Akron elected three new members to the Akron Public Schools Board of Education Tuesday. One of them made history.  

N.J. Akbar is the first openly LGBTQ Muslim elected in Ohio. Akbar is the assistant dean of University College at Kent State University. He said he was encouraged to run by a colleague at the university.

With his new position, Akbar wants to examine equity policies, increase flexibility in the academic calendar and be transparent about how the board operates.

Akron mayor Dan Horrigan
JENNIFER CONN / WKSU

Akron Democrats had a strong showing in Tuesday’s General Election. Many gathered at the Duck Club in downtown Akron for general election results, which ushered in a second four-year term for Akron Mayor Dan Horrigan.

Election 2019 Results

Nov 5, 2019

Final numbers are in from Summit County. Democrats will retain control of the mayor's office and all of the seats on Akron City Council. Here are the numbers:

HORRIGAN  77%      SINES  23%

JEFF FUSCO, LINDA OMOBIEN, and GINGER BAYLOR captured the three at-large council seats. 

Ward 1   RICH SWIRSKY wins reelection unopposed.

Ward 2  PHIL LOMBARDO  77%      TODD KLEINTOP  23%

Ward 3  MARGO SOMMERVILLE  91%    MICHAEL DOWNEY  9%

Ward 4  RUSS NEAL 79%   DeANDRE FORNEY  21%

Ward 5  TARA MOSLEY-SAMPLES wins reelection unopposed.

a concept photo of the building expansion
TC ARCHITECTS

One of Kent’s largest businesses is expanding its headquarters and expects to add as many as 200 support workers as it grows over the next decade. Davey Tree Expert Company said the expansion will begin next spring and double the size of its current headquarters building located at 1500 N. Mantua St.

photo of Veterans Witness Tree
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

Veterans will be at the Summit County Courthouse this week to highlight the mental health issues that face returning soldiers. Every morning, 22 dog tags will be placed on a Witness Tree to recognize that an estimated 22 veterans take their own lives each day. The project began in Pennsylvania. U.S. Army veteran John Schluep is bringing it to Akron. He’s a retired pastor, and he says many veterans experience a “spiritual crisis” after their service.

A photo of voter machines.
DAN KONIK / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

In addition to a host of local races, tax levies and ballot questions in this year's election, voters in two counties in Northeast Ohio will be asked to make changes in how county government operates. 

Summit and Cuyahoga Counties are the only two counties in Ohio to have a charter form of government. In order to make changes in their organization, voters must approve the changes.

Chris Horne stands on stage.
ILENIA PEZZANITI / THE DEVIL STRIP

Starting Nov. 1, Akronites can become part owners of The Akron Devil Strip. The arts and culture magazine is breaking ground as the first news co-op in the United States.

The idea is to keep the publication free to the community while also making it economically sustainable.

Since the publication began five years ago, founder Chris Horne has been the only owner. Now he’s looking to share the responsibility with the community.

a photo of Carlos Carrasco
ERIK DROST / WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Cleveland Indians pitcher Carlos Carrasco is being honored for his work off the field. The fan-favorite who’s been with the team for 10 seasons has been named baseball’s Roberto Clemente Award winner. WKSU's sports commentator Terry Pluto said Carrasco’s cancer diagnosis inspired him to do more.

photo of Dan Horrigan and Josh Sines
ANDREW MEYER / WKSU

On Nov. 5, Akron residents will decide who will lead their city for the next four years.  First-term Mayor Dan Horrigan, a Democrat, is facing a challenge from local business owner, Republican Josh Sines.

photo of opioid pills and bottles
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Summit County voters will decide this Election Day whether to renew a levy that supports mental health and addiction services. It’s been in place for 12 years and the funds are being used differently than in the past.

Issue 14 is a 2.95-mill levy that provides most of the funding for the Summit County Alcohol, Drug Addiction and Mental Health Services Board. The six-year levy was introduced in 2007 and previously renewed in 2013.

CARTER ADAMS / WKSU

Workers at the General Motors Lordstown assembly plant have built cars and a community for more than 50 years. Earlier this year, GM shuttered the plant, but hope had remained that it would not close permanently. GM’s new contract with union workers, approved Friday, dashed those hopes. 

WKSU joined workers on the picket line at the assembly plant last week for a final farewell to Lordstown.

photo of national guardsman at computer
DAN KONIK / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The state is now taking applications from civilians with internet and high tech security skills to join a special unit in the Ohio National Guard. The Ohio Cyber Reserve is a group of volunteers that would be trained to handle potential cyber-attacks on the government, infrastructure, or businesses.

Members of the Ohio Cyber Reserve would be on standby, and would be granted leave from work and compensated if called into active duty.

Aging Akron Police cruiser
TIM RUDELL / WKSU

A new dispatch system launched this month in Summit County will improve emergency response.

Computer Aided Dispatch (CAD) replaced aging, DOS-based technology that had been used by the county, the cities of Akron and Green and the University of Akron.

Brian Nelsen is chief of staff to Summit County Executive Ilene Shapiro. He said the new system will enhance how first responders react to emergencies.

photo of empty ohio house chamber
DAN KONIK / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The home rule provision was added to the Ohio constitution by voters in 1912, and the struggles between local officials and state lawmakers have raged almost since then. There have been claims that home rule is “under attack”.

Photo of Mike DeWine
TY GREENLEES / DAYTON DAILY NEWS

Two weeks after Governor Mike DeWine unveiled his so-called STRONG Ohio gun control package, groups on both sides of the issue are ramping up the rhetoric.

The plan disappointed many who wanted universal background checks and a law allowing a judge to take guns from someone deemed a threat. DeWine called for both after the Oregon District mass shooting.

Now, both sides are lobbying lawmakers as they consider DeWine’s gun violence bill. 

UAW workers in Parma begin voting Wednesday on whether to ratify a proposed agreement or stay on strike and negotiate another contract.

Union officials and GM reached a tentative agreement late last week. It met some union demands, including maintaining healthcare benefits and providing a path for temporary workers to be hired full time.

However, some workers think the contract needs to do more for them and future workers. That includes Mike Crose, a 35-year GM employee.

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