Thomas B. Fordham Institute

a photo of a classroom
SHUTTERSTOCK

This is the week that advocates for school choice are highlighting alternatives to traditional public schools.

One choice that may be available to a growing number of parents is a voucher to use public money to pay for private education.

That expansion of Ohio’s EdChoice voucher program could devastate public school budgets unless lawmakers take action this week.

Chad Aldis
THOMAS B. FORDHAM INSTITUTE

A proposed new school funding formula would cost the state $720 million more than the current K-12 budget. And it doesn’t include funding for charter or community schools, which the state spent more than $880 million on last year. 

photo of high school hallway
DOM ERNEST L. GOMEZ / SHUTTERSTOCK

Charter school advocates are calling on lawmakers to bump up their funding for facilities. They say the money now going to charters falls well below what they need. But critics say more changes should be made before a funding increase.

White Hat Management Leaves Ohio Charter Industry

Aug 8, 2018
photo of Chad Aldis
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

White Hat Management, the once-prolific Ohio charter school operator and early advocate for school choice in the state, is leaving the charter school business.

The company has been steadily losing contracts over the past few years in the competitive market.

Chad Aldis with the pro-charter research group Thomas B. Fordham Institute said the company’s exit is symbolic of the state’s charter school industry.

Akron Schools See a Major Boost in Graduation Rates

May 28, 2018
photo of Chad Aldis
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

One Northeast Ohio school district is graduating students at higher rates this year than in the recent past. But education advocates say the increase isn’t necessarily something to celebrate.

In all, 93 percent of Akron City Schools’ seniors are expected to graduate this year, up from an estimated 54 percent who were on track to graduate at the beginning of the school year.

Fordham Institute logo
FORDHAM INSTITUTE

The Thomas B. Fordham Institute says Ohio’s school report cards are unfair to schools with high rates of poverty.

The education research and advocacy group released its recommendations to improve Ohio’s school report cards Thursday. In it, the group says the state focuses too heavily on test scores and not enough on student long-term growth, leaving high poverty schools with D’s and F’s.

photo of report card
SHUTTERSTOCK

Two national education advocacy groups say Ohio could be doing better when it comes to its annual school report cards. Both groups say they’re too complicated.

 

In its review, the Data Quality Campaign says Ohio’s school report cards are written at a college reading level. And for the group's policy director, Brennan Parton, that’s a problem.

Elementary students
Karen Kasler / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Nearly one-third of Ohio public school teachers are chronically absent, according to a new national report. But the rate in charter schools is significantly less.

The report from the charter-school advocate Thomas B. Fordham Institute says nearly 29 percent of Ohio teachers in traditional public schools miss more than 10 days of school per year. In Ohio charter schools, the rate of chronic absenteeism drops to about 6 percent. The data does not include days teachers attend professional development training or school field trips.