State budget

Photo of Mike DeWine
TY GREENLEES / DAYTON DAILY NEWS

One of Gov. Mike DeWine’s 25 vetoes on the state budget struck a provision that was added at the last minute – a property tax reduction for certain homeowners in one wealthy school district, but not others.

photo of statehouse building
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

After the House and Senate couldn’t agree on a new state budget, lawmakers operated on a temporary spending plan

Now that a permanent two-year budget is in place, agencies can operate with certainty and know the amount of money they have to do the business of the state.

But it doesn’t mean every item in the budget is in effect now. 

photo of governor Mike DeWine
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Many of Gov. Mike DeWine’s 25 budget vetoes had to do with changes to Ohio’s Medicaid system. And part of that involves the two pharmacy benefit managers, or PBMs, the state uses as middlemen between Medicaid and pharmacists. The budget tries to rein in overspending on prescription drugs by moving to one single state-controlled PBM.

photo of Rep. Jim Butler
OHIO STATEHOUSE

Nearly half of the 25 vetoes that Gov. Mike DeWine issued when he signed the two-year state budget deal with health care and Medicaid, which is the state’s largest program. A member of the conference committee that worked on the compromise budget deal isn’t happy with those rejections.

a photo of governor Mike DeWine
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine signed the state budget 17 days after the constitutionally mandated deadline and 10 hours after a temporary budget expired. And when DeWine signed it, he included 25 vetoes.

a photo of a store selling CBD oils
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Most of the attention on lawmakers focused on their approval of a state budget 17 days after the deadline. But they also passed a bill to decriminalize hemp and license its cultivation.

Republican Rep. Kyle Koehler said Ohio is one of a handful of states that hasn’t allowed hemp cultivation. 

“It is imperative that Ohio moves quickly so that our farmers can take advantage of a domestic hemp marketplace and catch up with our neighboring states,” he said.

a photo of Lake Erie shoreline
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Now that the budget is signed, Gov. Mike DeWine said he’s already thinking about how to pay for water quality in Lake Erie after that two-year budget cycle ends.

DeWine wanted to front-load funding for clean Lake Erie initiatives by creating the H2Ohio Fund and putting $900 million in for the next decade.

Instead, lawmakers put $172 million in for the next two years. DeWine said he wants to take any surplus funds, which have been going to the state’s rainy day fund, and put those funds towards Lake Erie.

photo of a school hallway
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Ohio’s high school graduation requirements are changing, with a new set of recommendations for incoming freshmen made by a group of businesses, a charter schools organization and some public schools. And the law that allows the state to take over academically distressed school districts was put on hold. Both of those provisions are in the new two-year state budget approved by lawmakers.

a photo of protesters holding signs
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Ohio is operating on a budget extension since lawmakers failed to pass a new two-year state budget by the constitutionally mandated June 30 deadline. Some Democrats are questioning whether time that was spent on a controversial abortion law, recently put on hold by a federal court, could have been used better hammering out details of the state budget.

Democratic State Rep. Richard Brown said Republicans have control over the legislative and executive branch. So he thinks it’s ridiculous the budget wasn’t passed on time.

A photo of Larry Householder
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The clock is ticking for the Ohio House and Senate to reach a budget bill agreement. The deadline to continue funding state government is Sunday night. But, House leadership has a contingency plan.

House Speaker Larry Householder (R-Glenford) said the Senate made some major changes when it comes to health care reforms and tax cuts that don’t align with what his chamber wants.

The House and Senate easily passed their individual budgets, but lawmakers have been locked in a conference committee since Tuesday. The end of the fiscal year is this Sunday.

photo of Ohio Senate
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The Senate has passed a $645 million budget for the Bureau of Workers’ Compensation, after stripping out sections added by the House on first responders and immigration. 

The Senate cut a House provision that would allow first responders to file claims for post-traumatic stress disorder or PTSD without having to show physical injuries. Senate President Larry Obhof (R-Medina) said with both the BWC budget and the two-year operating budget needing to be signed by Sunday June 30th, Senators went back to Gov. Mike DeWine’s original BWC proposal.

photo of Concourse D
KEVIN NIEDERMIER / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, June 26:

photo of students at school
ASHTON MARRA / WCPN

The Senate's budget includes a set of high school graduation requirements that could settle that issue, which the state has been struggling with for years. The proposal in the budget comes from a coalition of business groups, school districts and a charter schools organization.

photo of Ohio Senate Ways and Means Committee
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

For the first time in 12 years, a two-year state operating budget has passed the full Ohio Senate without a single “no” vote. The Senate will send the $69 billion spending plan to a conference committee to work out conflicts with the House version.

Republican Finance Chair Matt Dolan said children and families, education, the environment, and local government were the Senate’s priorities. And he defended the 8% income tax cut and the restoring of the $250,000 small-business income tax deduction – a $700 million tax cut.

A photo of Matt Dolan
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The Ohio Senate’s budget plan adds more money to the fund that helps children who are dealing with severe mental and developmental issues. But the changes include a policy shift that helps parents maintain custody of their children in the process.

The Senate heard the testimony of several parents who were forced to give up their kids to get state-paid treatment.

Senate Finance Chair Matt Dolan (R-Chagrin Falls) said their budget will change the rules to avoid child custody relinquishment.

photo of Matt Dolan at a podium
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Ohio Senate Republicans made sweeping changes to the House version of the state budget, including larger tax cuts and restored tax breaks. The changes could set up a big battle between the House and Senate.

The Senate budget revives the small business income tax deduction on the first $250,000 earned. The House lowered that to the first $100,000.

It also brings back the film tax credit and diverts $125 million from school wraparound services to school choice vouchers.

Photo of Cuyahoga River
LYDIA TAYLOR / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Tuesday, June 11:

a photo of DeWine and Murnieks at a podium
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Total state tax collections were up 20 percent over estimates for April and 3.1 percent for May.

That’s leading the state budget director to revise her projections for a budget surplus for the close of the fiscal year at the end of this month.

A picture of a dog tick.
JEFF ST.CLAIR / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Friday, May 10: 

A photo of Governor Mike DeWine.
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Lawmakers in the Ohio House are looking over revisions made to the state’s two-year budget bill. The new version made several amendments to Gov. Mike DeWine’s original plan. 

The House’ version of the budget created income tax cuts for low and moderate-income Ohioans and cut several tax credits.

Republican leaders also decided to take out Gov. Mike DeWine’s 10-year, $900 million clean Lake Erie fund and replace it with just $85 million for the next two years.

photo of opioid pills and bottles
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Here are your morning headlines for Thursday, April 18:

Tracy Najera
CHILDREN'S DEFENSE FUND

Advocates for children are praising what they see in Governor Mike DeWine’s first budget, but they said kids need more. And they’re cautioning lawmakers who may decide to cut the budget based on forecasts of economic growth. 

photo of Rep. Emilia Sykes
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

As the Ohio House prepares to hold hearings on Gov. Mike DeWine’s proposed operating budget, Democratic members want to make sure their priorities are considered. Issues including a higher minimum wage, paid family leave, and health care security are all part of what the Dems call “Ohio Promise.” 

Democrats say their “Ohio Promise” Plan focuses on working families.

The House minority caucus is in an interesting position since half of Republican Speaker Larry Householder’s votes came from Democrats.

photo of Mike DeWine
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Gov. Mike DeWine said he will pay for the spending in his $69 billion dollar budget with economic growth – not new taxes or fees. He is not counting on a source of revenue several lawmakers have been hoping to secure since a big U.S. Supreme Court decision last year. That decision legalized sports gambling. DeWine said while it is not legal in Ohio, he said he expects things will be different soon.

A photo of Governor Mike DeWine
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Gov. Mike DeWine delivers his first State of the State speech Tuesday. He’ll deliver the address to a joint session of the Ohio House and Senate in the Statehouse, which is a change from the last seven years, when former Gov. John Kasich took the speech to different cities. 

  

It may be Mike DeWine’s first State of the State speech, but he said there won’t be any shocking reveals in it.

“I’ve outlined what we think is what should be the agenda of this administration, and those are the things we’re going to talk about," he said.