State budget

photo of students at school
ASHTON MARRA / WCPN

The Senate's budget includes a set of high school graduation requirements that could settle that issue, which the state has been struggling with for years. The proposal in the budget comes from a coalition of business groups, school districts and a charter schools organization.

photo of Ohio Senate Ways and Means Committee
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

For the first time in 12 years, a two-year state operating budget has passed the full Ohio Senate without a single “no” vote. The Senate will send the $69 billion spending plan to a conference committee to work out conflicts with the House version.

Republican Finance Chair Matt Dolan said children and families, education, the environment, and local government were the Senate’s priorities. And he defended the 8% income tax cut and the restoring of the $250,000 small-business income tax deduction – a $700 million tax cut.

A photo of Matt Dolan
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The Ohio Senate’s budget plan adds more money to the fund that helps children who are dealing with severe mental and developmental issues. But the changes include a policy shift that helps parents maintain custody of their children in the process.

The Senate heard the testimony of several parents who were forced to give up their kids to get state-paid treatment.

Senate Finance Chair Matt Dolan (R-Chagrin Falls) said their budget will change the rules to avoid child custody relinquishment.

photo of Matt Dolan at a podium
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Ohio Senate Republicans made sweeping changes to the House version of the state budget, including larger tax cuts and restored tax breaks. The changes could set up a big battle between the House and Senate.

The Senate budget revives the small business income tax deduction on the first $250,000 earned. The House lowered that to the first $100,000.

It also brings back the film tax credit and diverts $125 million from school wraparound services to school choice vouchers.

Photo of Cuyahoga River
LYDIA TAYLOR / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Tuesday, June 11:

a photo of DeWine and Murnieks at a podium
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Total state tax collections were up 20 percent over estimates for April and 3.1 percent for May.

That’s leading the state budget director to revise her projections for a budget surplus for the close of the fiscal year at the end of this month.

A picture of a dog tick.
JEFF ST.CLAIR / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Friday, May 10: 

A photo of Governor Mike DeWine.
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Lawmakers in the Ohio House are looking over revisions made to the state’s two-year budget bill. The new version made several amendments to Gov. Mike DeWine’s original plan. 

The House’ version of the budget created income tax cuts for low and moderate-income Ohioans and cut several tax credits.

Republican leaders also decided to take out Gov. Mike DeWine’s 10-year, $900 million clean Lake Erie fund and replace it with just $85 million for the next two years.

photo of opioid pills and bottles
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Here are your morning headlines for Thursday, April 18:

Tracy Najera
CHILDREN'S DEFENSE FUND

Advocates for children are praising what they see in Governor Mike DeWine’s first budget, but they said kids need more. And they’re cautioning lawmakers who may decide to cut the budget based on forecasts of economic growth. 

photo of Rep. Emilia Sykes
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

As the Ohio House prepares to hold hearings on Gov. Mike DeWine’s proposed operating budget, Democratic members want to make sure their priorities are considered. Issues including a higher minimum wage, paid family leave, and health care security are all part of what the Dems call “Ohio Promise.” 

Democrats say their “Ohio Promise” Plan focuses on working families.

The House minority caucus is in an interesting position since half of Republican Speaker Larry Householder’s votes came from Democrats.

photo of Mike DeWine
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Gov. Mike DeWine said he will pay for the spending in his $69 billion dollar budget with economic growth – not new taxes or fees. He is not counting on a source of revenue several lawmakers have been hoping to secure since a big U.S. Supreme Court decision last year. That decision legalized sports gambling. DeWine said while it is not legal in Ohio, he said he expects things will be different soon.

A photo of Governor Mike DeWine
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Gov. Mike DeWine delivers his first State of the State speech Tuesday. He’ll deliver the address to a joint session of the Ohio House and Senate in the Statehouse, which is a change from the last seven years, when former Gov. John Kasich took the speech to different cities. 

  

It may be Mike DeWine’s first State of the State speech, but he said there won’t be any shocking reveals in it.

“I’ve outlined what we think is what should be the agenda of this administration, and those are the things we’re going to talk about," he said.