Sports betting

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The Ohio House is considering a bill that would allow sports betting through the Ohio Lottery Commission, which can open the door to several venues. Speaker of the House Larry Householder stated his opinion on where sports betting should be allowed.

The bipartisan House bill would allow sports gambling in casinos and racinos.

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Gambling on sports is almost definitely on its way in Ohio, with two bipartisan bills in the legislature that will decide how it will be overseen by the state. But there’s also a debate over where sports betting will happen – in gambling facilities, at other venues, or even in people’s homes and pockets.

It’s been just over a year since the U.S. Supreme Court ruled states can legalize sports gambling.  But it was happening before that and since then.

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Here are your morning headlines for Friday, May 24: 

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Ohio lawmakers have been considering legalizing sports betting ever since the US Supreme Court ruled last year that states are allowed to do that. But there are two very different ideas on how to make that happen. 

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Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, April 10:

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Two state representatives have introduced a bill to legalize and regulate sports gambling, now that the U.S. Supreme Court has said states can do that. If it passes, sports betting would be limited at first, but could someday be offered in surprising venues.

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Some lawmakers are looking for a way to bring legal sports betting to Ohio. The move is in reaction to a U.S. Supreme Court ruling that allows states administer gambling on sports.

Sports betting is no longer federally banned, but states still need to create their own laws around the issue.

A bipartisan effort at the Statehouse would get the ball rolling with several meetings to gather input from any interested parties.

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OHIO CASINO CONTROL COMMISSION

Analysts following sports betting say it very likely will come to Ohio, now that the U.S. Supreme Court has legalized it across the country. The main questions are “when” and “where." The state’s established gambling institutions are already lobbying for what they want.

About $5 billion is bet on sports in Las Vegas every year, but that’s only about 3 percent of the amount that’s wagered illegally. 

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State Sen. Joe Schiavoni says he’ll introduce legislation to legalize sports betting in Ohio, just days after the major party gubernatorial candidates discussed the idea.

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Here are your morning headlines for Friday, May 18:

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Ohio lawmakers and the major party candidates for governor are considering the state’s options in the wake of a U.S. Supreme Court ruling clearing the way for legalized sports betting. One would-be developer says he won’t wait for officials to act.

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Here are your morning headlines for Thursday, May 17:

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A bill to legalize fantasy sports gaming in Ohio will soon be on its way to Gov. John Kasich after passing the Senate by a big margin.

Republican Dave Burke of Marysville spoke for the bill, saying it will legalize and regulate an activity for people who can pick sports winners.

“I don’t consider that gambling; I consider that skill.”

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A measure that would revise rules on fantasy sports, which haven’t been touched in decades, is on its way to the Ohio Senate after passing the House.

Under the proposal, players would have to be 18 or older and the companies running fantasy sports competitions would have to be licensed by the state.

House leaders are quick to note that fantasy sports as we know it today is entirely different than the paper-and-pencil version from the 90's.