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Editor's Note:  This story was originally published on December 20, 2017

Ohio’s 4th Congressional District isn’t the longest in the state. Nor the most convoluted. Nor does it have the most disenfranchised voters. But it has the distinction of being near the top in all three categories -- and of being home to one of the most liberal communities in the country represented by one of the most conservative members of Congress. In the third part of our series “Gerrymandering: Shading the lines,” WKSU’s M.L. Schultze travels the 4th – a study of contrasts from south to north.

photo of student climate protest in Cleveland
CHLOE FRIEDLAND

Fifty years ago a burning river mobilized a generation of environmental activism. Citizens pushed for new laws to regulate pollution, and our water and air has gotten cleaner.

But significant environmental challenges remain including climate change, habitat loss, and plastics pollution.

Our series Watershed looks at today’s environmental warriors and the road ahead.

Arrye Rosser opens a 1969 issue of Time Magazine that shined a spotlight on the Cuyahoga River.
Mark Arehart / WKSU

When the Cuyahoga River caught fire 50 years ago it helped spark an environmental movement in America. However, there was little coverage at the time and no known photographic evidence of the actual blaze.

A photo that appeared in a 1969 Time Magazine article is often attributed to the fire.

For our latest story in our series Watershed, a look at the power of photography and how it’s shaped our understanding of the burning river.

photo of Lake Erie tugboat
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

Over the past 50 years, freight traffic on the lower Cuyahoga River has increasingly competed with smaller watercraft as the river has rebounded to become a recreation channel. Watershed is a series looking at our waterways and what the future holds for them. This installment looks at one river, competing interests.

a photo of Joy Mulinex
SARAH TAYLOR / WKSU

The Cuyahoga River and many other Northern Ohio streams and rivers are part of the Lake Erie Watershed, which encompasses 33 of Ohio's 88 counties, or more than one-third of the state. The lake provides drinking water to millions of people.

This week our series "Watershed" is taking a closer look at Lake Erie.

a photo of a sailbot on Lake Erie
CLAIRE TAYLOR / WKSU

In the early 1970s there was a cooperative effort between the United States and Canada to lower the amount of pollutants entering the Great Lakes. 

Around that same time a young northeast Ohio native was beginning a four-decade career at Ohio State University focused on cleaning up Lake Erie. 

photo of Cuyahoga River
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

Fifty years ago, the Cuyahoga River caught on fire. It wasn’t the first time this had happened. And it really didn’t become a big deal nationally until more than a month later when Time magazine ran an article on the fire.

Fifty years later, the river has rebounded. Watershed is a series from WKSU News looking at our waterways and what the future holds for them. In our opening story, we take a look at the current state of “the burning river.”

photo of Lauren Pannell
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

In recent years, many Northeast Ohio schools have seen an increase in the number of mental health issues affecting students. Part of the reason is a lack of access to care. But a growing number of local pre-schools are trying to help identify mental health and behavioral issues early-on. This follow-up to our series, “Navigating the Path to Mental Health,” looks at how one program is helping parents, students and teachers.

Artillary unit bombarding ISIS
DOD.gov

An estimated one-point-nine million U.S. veterans are now receiving mental health services. But studies commissioned by Congress and the Department of Defense (NIH, 2017), (National Acadamies of Science, Engineering & Medicine, 2018), and  (VA, 20180), say that may be half the number who should be.  

"Pink Slipping" Affects More Than Just The Patient

Jul 3, 2018
ALEXIS SCRANTON / THE BURR

In the world of mental health, emergency hospitalization can be a loaded topic. For some people, the image of a psychiatric hospital brings to mind movies like "Girl, Interrupted" or "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest."

The reality is far different — and the process behind deciding to hospitalize someone — also known as “pink slipping” — can be hard for the patient and the professional alike.

photo of Andrew Suvada
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

Northeast Ohio police are increasingly turning to new methods when responding to people experiencing a mental-health crisis as police departments are shifting their training to better serve people who need their help.

Curtis Harbour has trained his service dog Max to respond with love when Harbour feels stressed.
Mark Arehart / WKSU

One of the barriers to finding the right mental health care in Ohio can be the cost. However, there are providers who offer services at little or no cost to low-income clients. In this installment of our series "Navigating the Path to Mental Health," WKSU’s Mark Arehart looks at the financial challenges facing both patients and providers.

Photo of Peggy and Diane Mang
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU public radio

Nearly 60 years ago, mental-health treatment began its move from massive warehouses like the old Massillon State Hospital to community-based care. But the path to effective treatment continues to face challenges: from old stereotypes to new medications. In the third installment of our series, “Navigating the Path to Mental Health,” WKSU’s M.L. Schultze explores the evolution among providers, advocates and patients.

Photo of Mike Williams and his dog Lola
TIM RUDELL / WKSU

Editor's note: Mike Quirk was originally misidentified in this story.

Mental-health care can be hard to access in much of Ohio, especially away from the larger cities. This installment of our series Navigating the Path to Mental Health looks at the challenges along the way to finding and getting mental-health services.

JEFF ST.CLAIR / WKSU

One out of five Americans, this year, will experience a mental health disorder.

Yet, for all its prevalence, many people dealing with mental health crises still face stigma and shame.

In the first installment of our series “Navigating the Path to Mental Health,”  WKSU’s Jeff St.Clair brings us the stories of four people fighting the stigma.

early voting 2012
ROMULUS MILHALTEANU / WKSU

In Ohio, state lawmakers and voting advocates are working on perhaps-competing plans to revamp Congressional redistricting. But ours is not the only state struggling with how political maps are drawn. A Wisconsin case is before the U.S. Supreme Court. A voter initiative is underway in Michigan. Lawmakers are debating change in Pennsylvania. And California has replaced politicians with a citizen commission. In the final installment of our series, “Gerrymandering: Shading the Lines,” WKSU’s M.L. Schultze looks at the efforts here and elsewhere.

Jack Cera
KAREN KASLER / OHIO PUBLIC RADIO

Ohio voters may see not one, but two, issues next year overhauling the way congressional districts are drawn. In the words of one advocate: “I care about slaying the gerrymander because I’m an American.”

Here is the fourth installment of our series, “Gerrymandering: Shading the Lines."

On election night two years ago, Catherine Turcer of Common Cause Ohio couldn’t have been more thrilled.

collecting signatures
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU public radio

Over the past five decades, Ohio’s Congressional districts have become increasingly “safe” for incumbents. And a big reason for that is the way the districts are strategically drawn for maximum political gain. In the second part of our series, “Gerrymandering: Shading the Lines,” WKSU’s Kabir Bhatia looks at how Ohio got to be this way.

Mark Arehart / WKSU

Ohio’s congressional map divides Summit County into four jagged, meandering pieces – making it – along with Cuyahoga County – the most divided in the state. And unlike Cuyahoga, none of the four members of Congress who represent Summit County lives in the county.

In the first part of our series Gerrymandering: Shading the Lines, we take a look at what that means when it comes to representing the area in D.C.

Tiffany Stacy and Paulina Subba
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU

Editor's Note: This is the final installment in our week-long series looking at the impact of the Bhutanese refugees on Akron. It also is part of a collaboration with the Huffington Post.

Sanchu Rai
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU

Editors's note: This the fourth in a week-long series WKSU is doing on the integration of Bhutanese-Nepali refugees, who began their migration to Akron a decade ago. This story also is part of a collaboration with the Huffington Post.

Mongali Rai and Ash Maya Subba
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU public radio

Editors's note: This is the third report in a week-long series WKSU is doing on the integration of Bhutanese-Nepali refugees, who began their migration to Akron a decade ago. This story also is part of a collaboration with the Huffington Post.

Dance class
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU public radio

EDITOR'S NOTE: This second part of a collaboration between WKSU and the Huffington Post focuses on the impact of Bhutanese refugees on the music of Akron.

Hindu Teej festival
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU

Editors's note: This is the first report in a week-long series WKSU is doing on the integration of Bhutanese-Nepali refugees, who began their migration to Akron a decade ago. Tomorrow, we’ll explore the fusion of music that is emerging.

photo of Todd McKenney
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

This fall, the Ohio House will consider a measure that could quash public complaints about probate judges. The amendment was first included and removed from the budget. But weeks later, it appeared as a standalone bill.

In this final part of our look at the “Power of Probate Judges In Ohio,” WKSU’s Kabir Bhatia looks at efforts to increase or decrease their power.

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