school funding

The legislation making changes across a variety of state policies because of coronavirus also settled an issue that lawmakers had been struggling with for months. That’s the question of how many students would qualify next school year for the state’s largest private school voucher program.

DAN KONIK / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

21 bills were signed into law in Ohio in 2019, including the new $69-billion-dollar two-year budget, a controversial energy bill that reduced or eliminated clean energy standards….and an abortion bill that was put on hold by a federal court before it could take effect.

a photo of Ohio Hous Speaker Larry Householder
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The head of the Ohio House says the state may need to come up with a new way of funding schools to reach a level of fairness. And Speaker Larry Householder (R-Glenford) is suggesting that could involve redistribution of wealth to districts around the state.

Householder says wealthier districts have high family incomes and business properties, like Olentangy Local Schools in Delaware County, while poorer districts, like Trimble in Athens County, cannot generate the same money with the same effort. So he’s suggesting the state could pool all of those funds.

Ohio lawmakers will soon consider a school funding formula overhaul, which has undergone some changes since it was first introduced in March. But the state’s leading school funding expert says he’s giving the plan mixed grades, and that it needs more work.

a photo of governor Mike DeWine
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine signed the state budget 17 days after the constitutionally mandated deadline and 10 hours after a temporary budget expired. And when DeWine signed it, he included 25 vetoes.

a photo of a school hallway
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

As the state considers changing the school takeover model for struggling districts, a group is calling on lawmakers to make sure students and school leaders of color are represented. The group says local experts need to be part of the conversation.

Academic Distress Commissions are designed to take over failing school districts from the local school boards by handing control to an appointed CEO.

A photo of Representative Bob Cupp
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

School administrators are looking through the latest estimates from a new school-funding formula proposal. While many lawmakers and some larger education groups have come out to support the plan, there are individual school districts that are still not on board. 

a photo of a school hallway
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

A group of school districts that aren’t getting the money they say they should, according to the state’s school funding formula, have threatened a federal lawsuit if the issue isn’t resolved.

The number of districts that are said to be on the cap, meaning the formula calculates they should get more money than they do because the state has capped their total dollars, is 166.

a photo of Larry Householder
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The speaker of the Ohio House of Representatives called the threat of a lawsuit from a central Ohio school superintendent “unfortunate.” The issue revolved around the 166 districts that are getting less money from the state than the school funding formula said they should.

Speaker Larry Householder says lawmakers plan to work on changing the school funding formula.

photo of opioid pills and bottles
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Here are your morning headlines for Thursday, April 18:

Summit County Courthouse
WIKIPEDIA

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, April 17: 

Chad Aldis
THOMAS B. FORDHAM INSTITUTE

A proposed new school funding formula would cost the state $720 million more than the current K-12 budget. And it doesn’t include funding for charter or community schools, which the state spent more than $880 million on last year. 

photo of Bob Cupp, John Patterson
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The Republican and Democratic lawmakers behind the new school funding formula proposal are taking their plan on the road to explain it to different teachers and school administrators around Ohio.

Representatives Bob Cupp (R-Lima) and John Patterson (D-Jefferson) said their formula ends up accurately reflecting how much state money each school district needs. 

photo of Bob Cupp, John Patterson
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Two state lawmakers, who say they’ve made Ohio’s school funding formula more stable and fair, have released financial details that show what Ohio's 612 school districts will get. And they’re also showing the plan will cost the state a lot more money.

Right now, more than half of Ohio's school districts got less money from the existing formula than they did last year, so the state made up difference.

photo of Bob Cupp, John Patterson
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Governors and state lawmakers have struggled for decades with school funding. The Ohio Supreme Court has struck down the property-tax based funding method four times in the last 22 years. Now two lawmakers say they think they’ve finally fixed it. Their new school funding formula they say is stable, customizable and transparent.

photo of e-school funding discussion
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The Ohio House and Senate are exploring options when it comes to how the state gives money to e-schools. The debate over funding can get complicated.

There are several types of e-schools in Ohio. There are digital platforms found within traditional public schools, charter schools, and dropout prevention and recovery schools.

The question for the joint committee on e-school funding is what should they base the funding off of -- enrollment, course completion or graduation.

photo of Melissa Cropper
DAN KONIK / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Ahead of Republican Gov. Mike DeWine’s first State of the State speech, a progressive-leaning coalition of health and human service organizations and labor unions said Ohio is falling behind the rest of the nation in some key areas. The One Ohio Now report said the state has not invested enough in schools, health and community safety. 

Chart with increases in revenue
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

A report commissioned by Ohio’s three major public school groups shows that state funding for K-12 education hasn’t bridged the gap between rich and poor districts.

It’s the first comprehensive look at state and local aid for schools since a landmark Ohio Supreme Court ruling declaring the property tax based funding system unconstitutional.

The University of Akron Looks to Recruit Ohio athletes

Feb 3, 2018
Photo of University of Akron
UNIVERSITY OF AKRON

The University of Akron is looking to recruit more Ohio athletes for their sports programs as a means of also bringing in more state funding to the school.

Funding is awarded for every course a student completes, as well as when they graduate— and President Matt Wilson says Akron’s athletes graduate at a higher rate than the student body.

photo of Gov John Kasich at OSBA meeting
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The relationship between Gov. John Kasich and Ohio’s education leaders has been troubled for years. When it comes to school administrators, they’ve seen proposals from Kasich that cut funding and change the structure of school boards. These decisions loomed over Kasich as he addressed a statewide school boards association conference for the first time in his seven years in office.

photo of Gov. John Kasich
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Gov. John Kasich and lawmakers are about to go into another budget season where state leaders will likely have to find ways to cut back.

Kasich is insisting they increase funding in at least one area.

photo of Tony Dunn
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

  A collection of frustrated school administrators say it's time for the state to change the way charter schools get their money. Statehouse correspondent Andy Chow reports.

When a student leaves a traditional public school district for a charter school, a certain amount of money is taken out of the district’s funding pot and follows that student.

About 35 school districts passed resolutions calling for the state to change that.