Sage Lewis

Sage Lewis in the tent city
Tim Rudell / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, July 24:

Zoning Board Denies Akron Tent City Appeal

Jan 30, 2019
photo of Sage Lewis
MARK URYCKI / WCPN

Supporters of a small tent city for the homeless on private property in Akron lost their zoning appeal Wednesday.

Land owner Sage Lewis told the Akron Board of Zoning Appeals his charity had helped some homeless reintegrate back into society but some,  he said, just cannot use the existing shelter system.

“If you’d like I can take you to people living under bridges. We can go do that right now. They are living there right now. They’re outside living there right now," Lewis said.

A photo of Governor Mike DeWine.
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Here are your morning headlines for Thursday, January 10:

photo of Voluneers at tent village clean up
TIM RUDELL / WKSU

Second Chance Village is all but gone.  The last tents of the homeless camp on the back lot of a commercial property in Akron’s Middlebury neighborhood were coming down Thursday.

Facing a Sunday deadline from the city for having the lot totally cleared, volunteers joined residents of the encampment in a final cleanup. More than half of the 45 or so people who’d been living there are going to homeless shelters. But the rest, who can’t or don’t want to be placed in government or charity run facilities are heading back to the streets.

photo of Second Chance Village
TIM RUDELL / WKSU

Sunday will be the last day for Akron’s Second Chance Village.  The city ordered the homeless camp closed weeks ago saying it violates zoning laws. But a deadline for clearing the property had not been set until now.

Sage Lewis owns the property. The homeless camp is behind his business in the Middlebury neighborhood. He organized it so people who are homeless but don’t want to be in living spaces run by government agencies and churches have someplace to go.

A photo of hands on jail bars.
SPAXIAX/SHUTTERSTOCK

Here are your morning headlines for Tuesday, December 11:

Photo of Second Chance Village
MARK AREHART / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Monday, December 10: 

photo of Scond Chance Village
TIM RUDELL / WKSU

The city of Akron won’t force homeless people to move out of a tent city in the Middlebury neighborhood by Thanksgiving.

In September, city council rejected property owner Sage Lewis’s request to rezone the land and allow the tent city to remain. Lewis had sixty days to clear the property. As of last week 25 people remained.

Mayor Dan Horrigan says the city’s been working with a variety of community agencies who are part of the Continuum of Care to find placements for all of them and does not intend to evict them this week.

Deadline Looms for Homeless Living in Akron's Tent City

Nov 14, 2018
Second Chance Village
MARK AREHART / WKSU

Twenty-five people living in an Akron resident’s backyard will have to find new homes by Thanksgiving.

Two months ago, the Akron City Council voted to evict the people living in a tent city at The Homeless Charity, owned by Sage Lewis.

photo of Sage Lewis, Andrea Fahey, Tara Samples
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

About two-dozen people were in Hardesty Park Sunday to protest Akron’s order to close a large homeless camp.

City Council last month denied a zoning request that would have allowed Second Chance Village to remain open.  The camp in the Middlebury neighborhood has been open since early 2017 and includes about 40 people living on a commercial property owned by entrepreneur Sage Lewis.

Andrea Fahey from Akron has been homeless in the past, and helped organize yesterday’s event.  She says Akron should be working with Lewis to find a way to keep the tent city open.

photo of Scond Chance Village
TIM RUDELL / WKSU

Akron City Council has set Thanksgiving as the deadline for the shutdown of Second Chance Village.

It’s been a busy week since Akron Council voted not to approve the zoning change that would have allowed Sage Lewis to continue operating Second Chance Village, about a dozen and a half tents and shelters set up behind his business on the city’s east side.

Along with the refusal on the change, though, the city said it wants to help find housing for all of the residents who’ve been living in those tents.

Sage Lewis in the tent city
Tim Rudell / WKSU

The Second Chance Village in Akron is going away.  But the founder of the homeless encampment, and his charity that has been supporting the tent city, are not. 

Since Akron city council voted not to allow a zoning variance for Second Chance Village, local realtor and auctioneer Sage Lewis, who sponsored the camp, has been looking for an alternative. 

Photo of Second Chance Village
MARK AREHART / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Tuesday, September 18:

Picture of Brandon Robinson, Destiny Williams and Son
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU public radio

Akron continues to struggle with what to do with a tent city for homeless people – and with what to do with its bigger homelessness problem. Here's a closer look at the legal battle and the options.

Destiny Williams and her now 3-month-old son, James, have moved on from Second Chance Village.

“He was conceived here, actually, so he’s the first Second-Chance baby.”

photo of Crowd gathered for Akron Council
TIM RUDELL / WKSU

Second Chance Village, a tent city for the homeless behind a thrift store in east Akron, is under threat of removal by the city for violating zoning laws.  But the people who live there have organized themselves and are formally applying for a conditional-use zoning permit. 

Second Chance Village
MARK AREHART / WKSU

The operator of a tent city for homeless people says he hopes to work with officials in Akron to address neighborhood concerns.

Second Chance Village
MARK AREHART / WKSU

The owner of a homeless encampment at odds with Akron zoning laws has scrapped plans to try to bring tiny homes to the property.

photo of Dan Horrigan
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

This Election Day, Akron voters are being asked to consider Issue 4, a quarter-percent income tax increase. It would be the first such increase in a generation.

In February, 1981, Roy Ray was capping his first year as mayor of Akron with a narrowly approved income-tax increase. The extra money was for “essential city services:" police, fire and roads.