red flag law

Photo of Mike DeWine
TY GREENLEES / DAYTON DAILY NEWS

Gov. Mike DeWine’s package of proposals to reduce gun violence through mental health and gun policy changes is getting mixed reviews. 

House Minority Leader Emilia Sykes (D-Akron) says the so-called STRONG Ohio plan is weak, especially since it doesn’t include required background checks, which DeWine said early on he wanted and which Democrats have been pushing for.

“It makes it much harder for people in our caucus to get behind something that we don’t quite see as legitimate and strong and what people have requested from us,” Sykes said. 

OHIO HISTORICAL ELECTION RESULTS

Here are your morning headlines for Monday, Oct. 14:

On Monday, Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine laid out the details of his 17-point plan – the STRONG Ohio plan – to address gun violence in the wake of the Aug. 4 mass shooting in Dayton that left nine dead and dozens wounded.

It is a plan, the Republican governor said, the Ohio legislature – dominated by his fellow Republicans – would vote to approve.

photo of Akron Public Schools headquarters
AKRON PUBLIC SCHOOLS

Here are your morning headlines for Tuesday, Oct. 8:

Two months and a day after Gov. Mike DeWine announced he was working on a plan to address gun violence after a mass shooting in Dayton, he’s unveiled a bill that he says lawmakers will approve.

a photo of vote buttons
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU

Here are the morning headlines for Monday, Oct. 7:

Gov. Mike DeWine's 17-point plan to address gun violence in the state following the recent mass shooting includes freeing up space at state psychiatric hospitals for people threatening violence or suicide.

Senator Rob Portman at the Ohio Statehouse
Statehouse News Bureau

Senator Rob Portman is speaking out in favor of background checks and red flag laws to prevent gun violence. But he says that the senate will only act on a measure it knows the president will support.

Portman says he has conferred with senators Lindsey Graham of South Carolina and Richard Blumenthal of Connecticut.

A federal red flag law would allow police to obtain a court order to confiscate guns from potentially dangerous people.

Portman said such intervention would have been appropriate in the case of the mass shooting in Dayton early last month.

Ohio Mayors from Both Parties Support Gun Reforms

Aug 26, 2019
Ohio mayors meeting during Ohio Mayors Alliance lucnheon.
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Members of a bipartisan group of mayors from around the state of Ohio are actively lobbying state lawmakers to consider a package of changes to gun laws and mental health policy. That 17 point proposal was unveiled by Gov. Mike DeWine in the wake of the Dayton mass shooting earlier this month.

Mayor Nan Whaley (D-Dayton) is a founding member of the Ohio Mayors Alliance. She says she’d go further than DeWine’s plan.

The last thing that Nan Whaley, the Democratic mayor of Dayton, wants to hear in the wake of the tragedy that rocked her city on the early morning of Aug. 4 is the usual partisan bickering and excuses by politicians who are in the pocket of special interests.

She doesn't want to hear it.

One of Gov. Mike DeWine’s proposed gun law changes in the wake of the shooting that killed 10 people in Dayton is an idea that’s been talked about before, and has passed in 17 states – a way to remove guns from people who are thought to be dangerous to themselves or others.

memorial service for Dayton shooting victims
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Gun regulation advocates say they're ready to start working with Gov. Mike DeWine and other lawmakers to pass what they call "common sense" measures.

Gun control advocates see DeWine's proposals for a version of the "Red Flag Law" and expanded background checks as a good first step towards reducing gun violence.

And Kristine Woodworth with Moms Demand Action had a message for Ohio lawmakers who don't come to the table.

In May, when 14 tornadoes ripped through Dayton, Ohio, and its suburbs, there was no force on Earth that could stop the destruction.

Tornadoes can't be legislated out of existence.

Tim Ryan, U.S. Congressman from Ohio
WOSU

Here are your morning headlines for Tuesday, April 30:

Larry Obhof
Andy Chow / Statehouse News

The Ohio Senate President says he’s eyeing two high-profile gun laws for next year. The issues fall on both sides of the gun control debate.

Republican Senate President Larry Obhof (R-Medina) said he’d like to revisit a self-defense bill that eliminates the “duty to retreat” provision.

Somewhat surprisingly, Obhof said he’d also like to take a closer look at the “red flag law,” which allows a court to take firearms away from a person who poses a threat to themselves or others.

photo of Ohio Statehouse
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Here are your morning headlines for Friday, May 25:

A photo of the Senate chamber on the first day of session, January 2017.
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Here are your morning headlines for Thursday, May 17:

photo of RTA blue line train
MICHAEL BARERA / WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, May 16:

photo of Kent State
KENT STATE UNIVERSITY

Here are your morning headlines for Tuesday, April 24: