recycling

A Republican-backed bill to prohibit communities from banning plastic bags and other disposable containers passed the Senate on a mostly party line vote, after a significant change related to the COVID-19 pandemic.

recycle bin
JENNIFER CONN / WKSU

Akron’s recycling program has changed over the past few years, as the value of recycled materials has fluctuated.

photo of recycling bin
WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Tuesday, May 12: 

photo of recycling bin
WKSU

Cleveland officials announced last week that the city’s recycling program is on-hold – and the councilman who represents the downtown area wants to know why.

a photo of the MRF in Akron
CARTER ADAMS / WKSU

Trash and recycling haulers in Northeast Ohio are seeing an increase in residential garbage as a result of the stay-at-home order from the coronavirus pandemic. At the same time, the haulers are trying to keep employees safe, and that is leading to some cuts in service, depending on where you live.

Picture of Mark Suchan.
Joe Gunderman

The Quasar Energy Group has been tasked with hauling away Kent State University's food waste that was ground up through the Grind2Energy system. The food waste will then be fed to Quasar's anaerobic digester. 

Mark Suchan is the Director of Materials Management for Quasar Energy Group. Quasar is a Cleveland company that speacializes in renewable energy and organics management.

crane feeds an auto shredder
JENNIFER CONN / WKSU

If you live in the Rust Belt, you’ve likely seen your share of scrap metal yards. Scrap might look like rusted junk, but industrial recycling remains a robust industry. Industrial recycling, combined with commercial material from retail operations, makes up the majority of the U.S. recycling industry today.


illustration of coronavirus
ANGELA HSIEH / NPR

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, Feb. 19:

Bainbridge Township recycling center
AMANDA RABINOWITZ / WKSU

Recycling in Ohio’s rural communities is all about choice and effort. If curbside is available, it’s expensive, leading many people to rely on dropoff centers. But some areas just want to do it their way, which can be a challenge.

photo of Meredith Ersing
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

When it comes to recycling plastic, most people check for a number on the bottom of every container. But what does that number actually mean, and why are some plastics not recyclable? This installment of our series, Reduce, Reuse, Refocus traces the life cycle of a piece of plastic.

Heather Dougherty stands next to Grind2Energy storage tank
Joe Gunderman

Kent State University is adding a Grind2Energy system in the dining area of it's new Design Innovation Hub.  No food scraps pre- or post-consumer will go to a landfill, but rather will be ground and stored until it is trucked to a processing system that will turn those scraps into energy and soil enhance

We heard it from you time and again.

"Why can't I find one place where I can get what I need to know about recycling in my city, my village, my township?"

We looked. We couldn't find one either.

As part of our series, Reduce Reuse Refocus, we decided to build one for you.

photo of Andrew Meyer
PAGE SAMPSON

Where do all our recyclables go after sorting?

How clean should they be before they go into the bin?

Is recycling profitable at all?

Does my recycling really get recycled?

That’s just a small sampling of the questions we got from our listeners when we asked you for ideas for our next series. An overwhelming majority of you told us that you wanted to know more about recycling. Time and again, those questions pointed to a state of confusion.

photo of recycling bin
WKSU

In Cleveland, most of the recycling residents put at the curb is not being recycled. City leaders says it’s a problem many cities are dealing with because of a changing market and contaminated items.

Cleveland has hired a consultant to help them figure out a new path forward. It will likely involve a drastic reduction in the program.

photo of U.S. Capitol Building
Sean Xu / SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

The impeachment debate is drawing a big line between Republicans and Democrats. But the parties are working together on some bills. 

Republican U.S. Sen. Rob Portman is working on a bipartisan bill that he says would increase recycling. But he said voters don’t often hear about efforts like that.

“So much of the media is focused on controversy because, I guess, it sells," he said.

Share Your Input for WKSU's Next News Series

Jul 5, 2019
SARAH TAYLOR / WKSU

One of the priorities of WKSU News is to produce in-depth reporting that delves into topics that are important to the communities we serve. Our goal is to produce comprehensive, informative and engaging stories that make a difference in the lives of our audience. WKSU’s journalists are considering three ideas for the future. But in order to best serve our audience, we value your input. Which one is most important to you?

 

 

a photo of compost heap
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

Acme Fresh Market in the Portage Lakes is working with high school students to keep more of its garbage out of landfills.

 

The company began a composting program in January.

Carrie Soful, a biology teacher at Manchester High School, reached out to Acme after she saw old cucumbers being tossed in the garbage by workers at the store.

akron recycle bin
Jennifer Conn / WKSU

Municipal recycling programs are as different as the communities they serve. But keeping a large recycling stream pure is a universal challenge.

The city of Akron has launched an initiative to combat the increasing volume of contamination in its recycling streams.

Over the next three months, the “Recycle Right” campaign will rely on bin inspections and ongoing communication with residents, according to Akron Chief of Staff James Hardy.

photo of recycling bin
WKSU

The City of Akron has partnered with local sustainability organizations to institute a Recycle Right campaign. ReWorks and Keep Akron Beautiful will work with the city to teach residents how to properly recycle.

Keep Akron Beautiful CEO, Jacqui Ricchiuti, says people need a refresher on what is recyclable.

Five Central Ohio communities will be handing out 38,000 new recycling bins to their residents, free of cost, over the next month.

photo of recycling bin
WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Monday, November 26:

photo of recycling bin
WKSU

Cleveland officials say they’ve starting handing out $100 fines to people who don’t deal with their trash and recycling properly.

Starting Wednesday, the city is writing citations for residents who mix trash with recycling or leave garbage outside of trash cans.

Michael Cox is the city’s director of public works. He said improper handling of waste is costing the city time and money.

photo of recycling bin
WKSU

Cleveland residents who don't follow the rules for recycling will be fined starting Wednesday. 

Diane Bickett is the Executive Director of the Cuyahoga County Solid Waste District, which provides information on the do’s and don’ts of recycling. She said the entire county is dealing with issues related to improper recycling.

UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS

Here are your morning headlines for Friday, July 27:

  • Judge grants gag order in UH fertility case;
  • Congressman Jim Jordan announces he'll run for Speaker of the House;
  • More former OSU students come forward in alledged sexual misconduct case;
  • Cleveland to roll out recycling fines Aug. 1;
  • Former U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder campaigns for gubernatorial candidate Richard Cordray;

Judge grants gag order in UH fertility case

a photo of vote buttons
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU

Here's your morning headlines for Tuesday, June 12: 

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