protests

Ohio coronavirus dashboard for July 12, 2020.
OHIO DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

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The team overseeing Cleveland’s police reform agreement will review the department’s handling of local demonstrations prompted by the death of George Floyd.

Monitor Hassan Aden notified city leaders of the review in a memo dated June 17 and filed in federal court Thursday. The review will examine preparations for the protests, community engagement, arrests and uses of force, Aden wrote.

A bicycle mounted Cleveland police officer rides along the street during an inaguration day protest in downtown Cleveland. Friday, Jan. 20, 2017.
CARTER ADAMS / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, June 10:

DeWine Wants Standards On Law Enforcement Response To Protests

Jun 9, 2020

As demonstrations continue in honor of George Floyd, and many cities in Ohio and elsewhere have come under fire for police response to such protests, Gov. Mike DeWine on Tuesday announced he is asking Ohio's Collaborative Community Police Advisory Board to develop minimum standards on law enforcement response to mass protests.

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Here are your morning headlines for Friday, June 5:

As protests continue across Ohio and the country, the state's Republican U.S. Senator says President Trump could be doing more to help those demonstrations from spiraling into violence.

a photo of protesters in Akron
JOSH TROCHE / USED WITH PERMISSION

Officials with the Summit County Public Health Department say – when it comes to protests – they’re concerned about it leading to community spread of coronavirus.

Northeast Ohio communities have seen a number of protests following the May 25 police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis.

Health Commissioner Donna Skoda says protesting is their right, but she asks that it be done safely.

A bicycle mounted Cleveland police officer rides along the street during an inaguration day protest in downtown Cleveland. Friday, Jan. 20, 2017.
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a photo of a protester in Cleveland.
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Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, June 3:

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/ U.S. SENATE

Senator Rob Portman (R-Ohio) says Ohio will not likely need the military force President Trump is threatening to deploy to quell violence in some states.

Portman says the National Guard is doing a sufficient job of keeping the peace in Ohio.

"I would want to see us continue to rely on local law enforcement and those who are trained to deal with these kinds of situations, you know our Ohio National Guard," Portman said. 

Portman says he can’t speak for what type of action might be needed in other states. He says now is the time for calm and for dialogue.

JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Gov. Mike DeWine dedicated most of his press conference about the coronavirus Tuesday to discussing racism in the state. 

Updated: 8:20 a.m., Tuesday, June 2, 2020

Wearing masks and speaking to jailed defendants by videoconference, judges on Monday began hearing the cases of the dozens of people arrested during the weekend’s demonstrations in Downtown Cleveland.

Defendants face charges including aggravated riot, breaking and entering and failure to comply with a police officer’s orders. Most of those arraigned Monday received personal bonds, allowing them to leave jail without putting down any money.

Updated at 9:31 p.m. ET

Escalating his rhetoric during a period of roiling national crises, President Trump on Monday threatened to deploy the U.S. military to cities or states that don't take "necessary" actions to halt violent protests, saying the armed forces will "quickly solve the problem for them."

Trump's Rose Garden remarks came as just across the street, law enforcement officers deployed tear gas and shot rubber bullets to forcefully disperse peaceful protesters. Washington, D.C., had set a curfew Monday of 7 p.m. ET.

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IBERDROLA RENEWABLES

Here are your morning headlines for Tuesday, July 31:

  • Ohio EPA approves wind turbine project;
  • Gov. Kasich signs payday lending bill;
  • Cultivator license awarded to Eastlake med pot business;
  • Canton pushes Market Square project forward;
  • Baldwin Wallace strips theater building namesakes amid allegations;
  • Ohio University drops ban on spontaneous protests;
  • Three charged in Cleveland construction site scam;

Ohio EPA approves wind turbine project

photo of Poor People's Campaign Die-In
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Clergy members and advocates for the poor from around the state converged at the Statehouse Monday for what’s being called a “die in."

This event was the third weekly protest for these activists, and the most dramatic so far. 

As some drummed or carried signs, others laid down on the pavement in front of the building, some even blocking doors. Advocates are demonstrating against environmental, health and tax policies they say are killing poor people.

photo of March for Our Lives in Cleveland
PHILIP DE OLIVEIRA / WKSU

Thousands of gun control advocates gathered in Cleveland on Saturday for what was called The March for Our Lives. It was one of hundreds of marches held nationwide in response to last month’s deadly high school shooting in Parkland, Florida.

Saturday’s march drew thousands to Public Square for the student-led protest against gun violence. One of the organizers was Solon High School senior Pranav Iyer.

“The Parkland shooting was really a call to action," Iyer said.

photo of anti-Trump protesters
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

There are important dos and don’ts that come with protesting, according to a group that’s holding a workshop in Columbus to teach people how to demonstrate within their constitutional rights.

Protests and demonstrations are protected under the First Amendment. But protests that get out of hand and turn violent are no longer peaceful assemblies and can lose Constitutional protection.  That’s among the concepts the ACLU will go over in the workshop.

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