politics

photo of Case Western Reserve University
CASE WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY

With 24 candidates seeking the Democratic nomination for president, it may be mathematically impossible for polling to accurately determine a favorite.

That’s the analysis by a pair of mathematicians at Case Western Reserve University.

Alexander Strang is a PhD candidate who worked on the analysis. He points to something called the Condorcet Paradox.

The paradox considers a situation where there are three choices.

a photo of Doris Kearns Goodwin
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

During a visit to Ohio, prominent national historian and author Doris Kearns Goodwin said political divisiveness may be waning. Kearns Goodwin kicked off a new lecture series at the Statehouse by discussing her new book, "Leadership in Turbulent Times," which looks back at the leadership of Presidents Abraham Lincoln, Lyndon Johnson and both Teddy and Franklin Delano Roosevelt.

 

Doris Kearns Goodwin told reporters at the Ohio Statehouse the current political climate reminds her of the one former President Teddy Roosevelt faced more than a hundred years ago. 

Civility Center announcement
TIM RUDELL / WKSU

Akron leaders from education, government and the community are joining forces in the formation of a Civility Center for the Greater Akron Community. 

The center is being housed at the University Akron’s Bliss Institute of Applied Politics and its purpose is to foster greater civility in political discourse, especially at the local and regional levels. 

Picture of Michael Beam (left), picture of social media apps (right).
Kent State University / pixabay.com

How is personalized news (social media, cable networks, etc.) changing our roles as citizens? Michael Beam, Ph.D.  is an Assistant Professor in the School of Communication Studies at Kent State University.

Photo of People in the Training Facility at Richfield
Tim Rudell / WKSU

President Trump was in Ohio Thursday to promote his $1.5 trillion infrastructure plan. He spoke to a crowd of builders at a construction equipment training facility in Summit County.

In typical Trump fashion, the President began with a boast.

"I was good at building stuff … maybe better than I am a being president," Trump said.

Gov. John Kasich came in a strong second in Tuesday's New Hampshire primary with about 16 percent of the overall Republican vote.

Donald Trump was the first place winner, but Kasich gave what sounded like a victory speech…