Planned Parenthood

photo of opponents of bill to defund Planned Parenthood
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

One of the most controversial bills passed by the Ohio Legislature recently is still awaiting Gov. John Kasich’s signature. 

The bill to defund Planned Parenthood was passed by the Legislature more than a week ago. It strips $1.3 million for cancer screenings, H.I.V. tests and educational programs and sends that money to community health clinics. Opponents say those clinics don’t provide the same services and care as Planned Parenthood.

photo of John Kasich
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

  Gov. John Kasich signed a few bills over the weekend but not the controversial one that would defund Planned Parenthood. Ohio Public Radio’s Jo Ingles reports.

photo of Keith Faber
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The bill to defund Planned Parenthood is on its way to Gov. John Kasich’s desk, and he’s expected to sign it before the primary in South Carolina on Feb.  20.

photo of the Ohio Statehouse
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The Ohio House voted 59-32 Wednesday to defund Planned Parenthood. The bill now awaits Gov. Kasich’s signature.

The bill strips from the organization more than $1.3 million earmarked for cancer screenings, HIV testing and services other than abortions. But backers of this bill say the money would be better spent at community health clinics throughout the state. Opponents of the bill say there are not enough clinics throughout Ohio that can provide those services.

Stephanie Kight
PLANNED PARENTHOOD

  The Ohio Senate has voted to defund Planned Parenthood, but the bill won’t go into law just yet. Statehouse correspondent Jo Ingles reports.

Republican State Senator Peggy Lehner says passage of the bill to strip $1.2 million federal from Planned Parenthood comes down to one thing.

“They have chosen to be the leading abortion provider in this state.”

photo of Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine and Stephanie Kight of Planned Parenthood of Greater Ohio
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

A courtroom fight over what happens to fetal remains from abortions had Attorney General Mike DeWine and Planned Parenthood trading legal moves. But Statehouse correspondent Karen Kasler reports that battle has ended, at least for now.

 

KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

State lawmakers are introducing a bill to require women who have abortions or miscarriages to designate arrangements for burial or cremation of fetuses. Ohio Public Radio’s Jo Ingles reports.

Attorney General Mike DeWine found no evidence that Planned Parenthood of Ohio was selling body parts of aborted fetuses as had been alleged in a viral video. But that doesn’t make Republican State Rep. Kyle Koehler feel any better.

“Whether they are selling body parts or simply tossing them into landfills doesn’t matter to me anymore.”

Stephanie Kight
PLANNED PARENTHOOD

Planned Parenthood has filed suit against Ohio's health director, just two days after the state attorney general issued a report on how the group handles fetal tissue. WKSU’s Kabir Bhatia reports.

Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine's investigation into Planned Parenthood’s affiliates found no evidence that they made money from aborted fetuses, but the report did criticize the facilities for disposing of fetal remains in landfills.

Planned Parenthood is suing Ohio, claiming it reinterpreted a fetal tissue disposal rule without notifying anyone and specifically to target Planned Parenthood.

The organization says in a federal lawsuit filed today that the Ohio Department of Health denied it equal protection and due process, according to Associated Press.

STATE OF OHIO

  Attorney General Mike DeWine’s four-month investigation into the activities of Planned Parenthood clinics in Ohio clears the organization of wrongdoing in one way but opens up questions about another practice. Ohio Public Radio’s Jo Ingles reports.

After the high-profile videos that came out this summer that accused Planned Parenthood of selling fetal body parts, Attorney General Mike DeWine started an investigation into the organization’s three clinics statewide where abortions are performed.

“Our investigation found no evidence of that in the state of Ohio.”

A photo of Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Attorney General Mike DeWine’s four month investigation into the activities of Planned Parenthood clinics in Ohio clears the organization of wrongdoing in one way but opens up questions about another practice. Ohio Public Radio’s Jo Ingles reports.

After the high profile videos that came out this summer that accused Planned Parenthood of selling fetal body parts, Attorney General Mike DeWine started an investigation into the organization’s three clinics statewide where abortions are performed.

Photo of Rosenberger and Faber
Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

State lawmakers went home for the holidays after approving bills creating regulations for ride-sharing services, banning questions about criminal convictions on public-sector job applications and restoring a sales tax exemption for rare coins and bullion.

But Statehouse correspondent Karen Kasler reports, not included in the list is the controversial bill to defund Planned Parenthood.

 

There are two versions of the bill to strip $1.7 million from Planned Parenthood. 

Pages