pandemic

A photo of the library
JEFF ST. CLAIR / WKSU

The Akron-Summit County Public Library has announced its plans for reopening after weeks of closure due to COVID-19 concerns. The library will reopen in phases.

Most staff will return to buildings to prepare for service June 8, and patrons can start returning items June 16.

Marketing Communications Director Carla Davis says more than 300,000 items are currently checked out. The library will extend the due dates for those items until July 15 in an effort to spread out the return rush.

A photo of a factory worker.
/ CONSUMER ENERGY ALLIANCE

The manufacturing industry has suffered during the economic shutdown caused by the pandemic. A new report from the Institute for Supply Management expects the industry won’t return to pre-recession levels until 2022.

Joe Biden
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU

Like just about everything else these days, political campaigning has had to rely on virtual connections. This week, Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio) held an organizing call to rally support in Ohio for Vice President Joe Biden’s presidential campaign.

A photo of banners at Youngstown State University.
ASHTON MARRA / IDEASTREAM

Your morning headlines for Thursday, May 28:

A photo of Children's Akron campus
AKRON CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL

Health care providers locally and around the country are seeing a steep decline in the number of children being brought in for well visits.

Akron Children’s Hospital stopped offering well visits for children over the age of 3 in late March. Over the last two weeks it’s begun returning to full capacity.

photo desks and chairs
/ STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The coronavirus pandemic has led to unprecedented economic concerns for state government. In early May, the governor ordered state departments to cut spending by $775 million through the end of June. Cuts to education funding could affect the state’s charter schools.

photo of East CLC
EAST CLC

The COVID-19 pandemic has left high schools scrambling to create a commencement ceremony that follows social distancing protocols. While some schools have resorted to a virtual or drive-in ceremony, Akron Public Schools has come up with a way for more than 1,000 seniors to graduate in person.

GARRETT NAYLON

Ohio college students just finished their spring semester which was disrupted by the coronavirus pandemic. In early March, schools stopped in-person classes and switched to remote learning, upending campus life.

A Kent State University journalism class spent the week after spring break recording diaries about their experience. Garrett Naylon stayed in Kent and reflected on what it's like to live on a deserted campus. 

Hannah Stickel

Ohio college students just finished their spring semester that was disrupted by the coronavirus pandemic. In early March, schools stopped in-person classes and switched to remote learning, upending campus life.

A Kent State University journalism class spent the week after Spring Break recording diaries about their experience. Hannah Stickel named her last semester, "Zoom University."

GOOGLE EARTH

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, May 13:

MADISYN WOODRING

Ohio college students just finished a spring semester that was disrupted by the coronavirus pandemic. In early March, schools stopped in-person classes and switched to remote learning, upending campus life.

A Kent State University journalism class spent the week after spring break recording diaries about their experience. For Madisyn Woodring, finding motivation to do schoolwork from home was a challenge.

a photo of the Kent campus
KENT STATE UNIVERSITY

Here are your morning headlines for Thursday, May 7:

A photo of Floco Torres
PRINCE THEE ARTIST

Being cooped up inside during this pandemic makes it's easy to get cabin fever. You could be getting the itch to get more creative. Maybe you want to try writing poetry or lyrics. But where do you start? We reached out to Akron rapper and producer Floco Torres to get some advice on how to channel your thoughts into something with a beat.

photo of a woman
ADAM MELNYK / SHUTTERSTOCK

When we think about frontline responders, we usually think about people who save lives and rush into burning buildings. But in this pandemic, many frontline workers stock shelves and operate cash registers at grocery stores of all sizes.

When word first began spreading that coronavirus was deadly, contagious and close to home, newscasts showed panicky shoppers emptying stores of bread, milk and toilet paper.

But that wasn’t the case everywhere.

downtown construction
JENNIFER CONN / WKSU

Construction crews working on Akron’s Main Street Corridor project have been busy throughout the pandemic, keeping the city’s $31 million project on schedule.

Akron launched the project in 2018 to bring vibrancy back to its central business district and help boost the city’s declining population.

akron police training class
JENNIFER CONN / WKSU

The city of Akron has called eight furloughed employees back to work to create a decontamination team to help protect first responders.

GOV. MIKE DEWINE TWITTER / OHIO DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

Here are your morning headlines for Thursday, April 9:

OHIO DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

Here are your morning headlines for Thursday, March 26: 

CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION

Here are your morning headlines for Tuesday, March 24:

Updated at 12:34 a.m. ET Thursday

President Trump announced a 30-day ban on travel from European countries to the United States, beginning on Friday at midnight, in a bid "to keep new cases" of coronavirus "from entering our shores."

The restrictions, he said late Wednesday, do not apply to travelers from the United Kingdom.

a photo of Amy Acton
WBNS-TV Columbus

Ohio health officials have confirmed another case of COVID-19. The infected person is a 53-year-old Stark County man. His case is the fourth confirmed in the state. The Ohio Department of Health (ODH) reports 24 people are undergoing testing.