opioid settlement

a graph showing increase in daily coronavirus cases
OHIO DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

Here are your morning headlines for Thursday, July 9:

Dozens of cities and 73 of Ohio’s 88 counties have signed on to a statewide opioid plan for potential settlements with drug companies, Gov. Mike DeWine’s office announced Wednesday.

The OneOhio plan would direct 30 percent of total settlement dollars to local governments. A statewide foundation would handle 55 percent and the remaining 15 would go to the attorney general’s office.

The foundation’s board would include members representing state officials and local jurisdictions.

photo of Dave Yost
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Friday is the deadline for Ohio communities suing drugmakers and distributors to decide to continue with their lawsuits or join the state’s effort to reach what’s likely to be a massive settlement over the opioid crisis. 

Attorney General Dave Yost says there are several communities that haven’t yet had a chance to meet and discuss the One Ohio proposal, which he says would find its strength in numbers.

photo of Kent State
KENT STATE UNIVERSITY

Here are your morning headlines for Thursday, Feb. 13:

A photo of opioid pain pills.
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Here are your morning headlines for December 31, 2019:

Cuyahoga County hires manager to oversee opioid settelement funds;
Yost moves for dismissal of Sandusky County prosecutor;
Akron-based trucking company files for Chapter 11 bankruptcy;
Youngstown school board member-elect changes mind;
OH judges might be allowed to list party affiliation on ballots;
Delays in ECOT case;
Police to New Year's revellers-don't fire guns into the air;
Browns moving forward on head coach search;
 

Photo of Dave Yost
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

A constitutional amendment backed by Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost to set up a way to distribute opioid settlement money through a statewide foundation won’t go before voters in March. That’s according to the Republican and Democratic leaders of the House, who would have to approve the proposal by next week.

Democratic House Leader Emilia Sykes said taking away lawmakers’ role in appropriating money is problematic, but she says local communities filed these opioid lawsuits because the AG didn’t.

Summit County Leaders Disappointed by AG Move to Control Opioid Funds

Dec 6, 2019
Photo of Dave Yost
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The Ohio Attorney General's office wants a constitutional amendment to protect opioid settlement money. Attorney General Dave Yost says it would create a foundation that would ensure the money would be used specifically in the fight against the opioid epidemic.

Republican Leader Larry Householder
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The Republican leader of the Ohio House says he’s watching what happened this week with the last-minute settlement to stop the big opioid trial in Cleveland – and the billions of dollars involved in it.  

The nation's response to the deadly opioid epidemic has been broadly bipartisan, but deep divides have emerged over a settlement plan offered last month by Purdue Pharma, the maker of Oxycontin.

Democratic state attorneys general have generally panned the deal, which would force Purdue's owners, member of the Sackler family, to give up control of their company while paying roughly $3 billion in cash from their personal fortunes.