opioid lawsuit

Deal Reached In Cuyahoga, Summit Opioid Lawsuits

Oct 21, 2019

Updated: 5:39, Oct. 21, 2019

The three largest U.S. drug distributors and one drugmaker reached a $260 million settlement with Cuyahoga and Summit counties hours before the start of the first trial in the wide-ranging national litigation over the opioid crisis. 

Cuyahoga County Executive Armond Budish, Summit County Executive Ilene Shapiro and Cuyahoga County Prosecutor Michael O’Malley said they had reached a settlement in principle with distributors AmerisourceBergen, Cardinal Health and McKesson as well as drug manufacturer Teva.

The nation's response to the deadly opioid epidemic has been broadly bipartisan, but deep divides have emerged over a settlement plan offered last month by Purdue Pharma, the maker of Oxycontin.

Democratic state attorneys general have generally panned the deal, which would force Purdue's owners, member of the Sackler family, to give up control of their company while paying roughly $3 billion in cash from their personal fortunes.

Updated at 3:30 p.m. ET on Oct. 24

Make no mistake: The legal fight over liability for the U.S. opioid crisis is only heating up.

Summit County Initiates Opioid Plan Following Appeals Court Ruling

Oct 10, 2019
Photo of opioids
SHUTTERSTOCK / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

A federal appeals court in Cincinnati has rejected Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost’s request to delay the October 21 start for the huge opioid trial in federal court in Cleveland.

Although Cuyahoga County and Summit County just reached another lawsuit with an opioids manufacturer, Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost says there's still time for the court to hear his argument to pause the landmark opioid court case for thousands of local government in order for the state's case to go first.

Medications
TIM RUDELL / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, Oct. 2:

Opioid Trial Judge Will Not Recuse Himself

Sep 27, 2019

U.S. District Judge Dan Polster will not recuse himself from hearing the broad, national opioid litigation set to go to trial in Cleveland next month.

Several drug companies involved in the suits – including Cardinal Health, McKesson and AmerisourceBergen – filed a motion Sept. 14 objecting to the judge’s push for settlements and requesting he remove himself from the case.

Photo of President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump
LYDIA TAYLOR / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Monday, September 16:

photo of Dave yost
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

State Attorney General Dave Yost has moved to derail a massive suit against the opioid industry. He wants to halt the trial that's due to start in October in federal court in Cleveland to be delayed until the state's case against pharmaceutical companies is resolved.

The appeal is the latest attempt by Yost for the state to gain control of the opioid settlement case, which he argues would allow for a more comprehensive outcome.

A photo of Ilene Shapiro
COLLEEN KELLY / OFFICE OF SUMMIT COUNTY EXECUTIVE

Redevelopment of the former Austen BioInnovation Institute into the new world headquarters for the Smithers Group laboratory testing companies was among the announcements Summit County Executive Ilene Shapiro made at her annual state of the county address.

Updated at 7:04 p.m. ET

An Oklahoma judge has ruled that drugmaker Johnson & Johnson helped ignite the state's opioid crisis by deceptively marketing painkillers, and must pay $572 million to the state.

Oklahoma sought $17.5 billion, blaming Johnson & Johnson for fueling the crisis that has claimed the lives of more than 6,000 people in the state.

photo of John Kasich
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Former Gov. John Kasich is teaming up with former Ohio State University President Gordon Gee, who is currently president of West Virginia University, to fight for what could be hundreds of billions of dollars in opioid settlement money.

Kasich is lobbying for hospitals to get a big portion of the money out of the national lawsuit.

Updated at 10:44 p.m. ET

For the first time, a federal court in Ohio is releasing a trove of data that offers far more detail about the size and scope of the nation's opioid epidemic — and about the role played by drug companies and pharmacies like CVS, Walgreens and Johnson & Johnson that profited from the rapid growth of prescription opioid sales.

Tamir Rice's funeral
KEVIN NIEDERMIER / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Monday, October 8:

photo of Department of Justice
COOLCAESAR / WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Here are your morning headlines for Tuesday, April 3:

M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, Feb. 14:

Photo of opioids
SHUTTERSTOCK / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Dozens of lawsuits filed by cities, counties and states across the country against opioid manufacturers and distributors will be consolidated in an Ohio court.

A panel of federal judges decided Tuesday that 64 lawsuits filed in seven states, including Ohio, will have their cases consolidated and pretrial motions will be heard by U.S. District Judge Dan Polster in Cleveland.

photo of Nan Whaley
NAN WHALEY FOR OHIO

City officials around the state are mounting a charge again opioid drug companies, following the state’s announcement to sue manufacturers of powerful painkillers. 

A gubernatorial candidate is helping lead the charge.

The cities of Dayton and Lorain are suing nearly two dozen drug manufacturers and distributors.

Democratic Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley says the drug companies misled doctors in thinking that the pills were not addictive.