Ohio Supreme Court

photo of Niraj Antani, Bill O'Neill
OHIO PUBLIC RADIO

Several Republican leaders are calling for Justice Bill O’Neill to step down from the Ohio Supreme Court because he says he'll run for governor. One state lawmaker is taking it one step further by invoking a section in the constitution that could force O’Neill out.

Representative Niraj Antani's resolution would summon O’Neill before a joint session of the legislature. Antani says that's where lawmakers can address their concerns about O'Neill serving on the Supreme Court while running for another office.

OHIO SUPREME COURT

The announcement by Ohio Supreme Court Justice Bill O’Neill that he intends  to run for governor raises questions about his ongoing role with the state high court.  Now the only Democrat on the court has announced he will recuse himself from all new cases, for the time being.  

photo of Bill O'Neill
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

Ohio Supreme Court Justice Bill O’Neill has announced he’ll be filing to run for governor next year – on one condition.

photo of Ohio Supreme Court
DAN KONIK / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The Ohio Supreme Court says a law requiring people living with HIV to disclose their status to potential sexual partners is constitutional and doesn’t violate free speech rights. 

Orlando Batista was sentenced in Hamilton County to eight years in prison for not telling his girlfriend he’s HIV positive. His lawyer Josh Thompson said his behavior was reprehensible, but the law perpetuates a stigma that keeps people from being tested and getting treatment.

photo of judge gavel
ESB PROFESSIONAL / SHUTTERSTOCK

A divided Ohio Supreme Court says juvenile courts can dismiss sex charges against a child under 13 if the kids involved in sexual conduct were close in age. The decision in the case involved a 12-year-old and a 9-year-old.

WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

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Jim Renacci
NEOMED

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DAN KONIK / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

A state budget provision just taking effect would change an 80-year-old policy, requiring those who want to dispute tax decisions go to one of 12 regional appeals courts instead of the Ohio Supreme Court.  

The Ohio Supreme Court’s Director of Public Information, Edward Miller, says the change was requested after a flood of local property tax disputes, when the court’s main role is to rule on big cases involving the constitution.

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WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Here are your morning headlines for Friday, September 29th:

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Dan Konik

The Ohio Supreme Court has heard yet another case involving one of the state’s abortion providers. It’s the second one this month. But as Ohio Public Radio’s Jo Ingles reports, this case revolves around a different issue.

This case began a few years ago when state lawmakers attached restrictions on abortion to the 2013-14 state budget.

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CLEVELAND CLINIC

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COMMONS.WIKIMEDIA.ORG

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CITY OF HUDSON

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STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

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Quicken Loans Arena
MARK URYCKI / WCPN

The NBA says if the renovation of Quicken Loans Arena does not start in seven weeks, Cleveland will not be considered for the 2020 or 2021 All-Star Game.

photo of speed camera
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

Akron will bring back six school zone-speed cameras after an Ohio Supreme Court decision this morning. The case challenged a state law that requires police officers must be present -- and other conditions met --when the cameras are used.

The ruling, which affected about 20 Ohio cities, found those restrictions unconstitutional.

But Akron spokeswoman Ellen Lander-Nischt says she expects the legislative attacks on speed cameras will continue.

photo of traffic camera
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

The Ohio Supreme Court has upheld the right of cities to use traffic cameras without certain restrictions passed by state lawmakers, saying the state law that restricts those cameras is unconstitutional.

The court ruled 5-2 in striking three provisions of the law, including requirements that an officer be posted with each camera and that cities conduct traffic studies and awareness campaigns before turning on the cameras. Dayton’s Assistant City Attorney John Musto told the court in January that the law conflicts with local home-rule authority.  

Maureen O'Connor
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU

The Ohio Supreme Court today ruled in a Miranda rights case from Cleveland. The court says being questioned in the front seat of a police car is not the same as being interrogated while in custody.

In 2014, a Cleveland motorist nearly struck an Ohio State Highway Patrol car at night. The patrolman pulled him over, had him get in the front seat of the cruiser and asked how much alcohol he’d been drinking. The driver said he’d had four mixed drinks at a wedding.

Photo of the Ohio Supreme Court's main courtroom
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The Ohio Supreme Court has decided a tough case that involving two young parents, which will likely mean a 2-year-old child will be taken from the Tennessee family he’s lived with since birth.

The mother had been clear that the adoption was to happen immediately after the child’s birth in Butler County. She and the father had had only sporadic contact, and there was no financial support.

The father sued for custody, but two lower courts said he had willfully abandoned the mother. Now the Ohio Supreme Court has reversed that.

photo of Rick Teeters
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The state Department of Education can start collecting $60 million from Ohio’s largest online charter school. This comes after the Ohio Supreme Court decided not to grant an injunction. However, the fight is far from over.

photo of Ohio Supreme Court
DAN KONIK / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Ohio energy companies win some and lose some.  This week they lost a benefit in the new state budget that would have allowed them to charge customers more in order to achieve better credit ratings.

Ohio Supreme Court Justice Judith French
Ohio Supreme Court

The Ohio Supreme Court heard arguments today over whether a northeast Ohio man is entitled to the full report on DNA testing and other evidence. WKSU’s M.L. Schultze has more on the arguments in a death-penalty case that has stretched on for nearly three decades.

Justice Judith French
OHIO COURT NEWS

The Ohio Supreme Court will rule on whether the free speech rights of people living with HIV are violated by a law requiring they disclose their status to potential sexual partners

In July 2014, Orlando Batista was indicted in Hamilton County for felonious assault – for having sex with his girlfriend without telling her he’s HIV positive. He admitted in court that he had also infected at least two other women, one of whom passed the virus onto their child.

photo of judge gavel
ESB PROFESSIONAL / SHUTTERSTOCK

Kids under 13 can’t be charged with rape in Ohio. But the Ohio Supreme Court will decide if they can be charged with other sex crimes if both involved in the act were under 13. The question surrounds arguments in a case involving a 12-year-old and a 9-year-old.

Not much is known about what happened between the boys. So attorney David Strait argued charging the 12-year-old with gross sexual imposition violates his rights because Ohio law protects kids under 13.

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