Ohio Supreme Court

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STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

What was the state’s largest online charter school has lost another round in court. It’s another blow to ECOT founder Bill Lager, who’s on the hook to pay back $60 million to the state.

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SHUTTERSHOCK

A union that intended to put a measure capping kidney dialysis costs on the Ohio ballot this fall said it isn’t giving up, despite a ruling from the state’s top court that won't allow the measure to come before voters  this November.

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DAN KONIK / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Ohioans won’t vote this fall on a ballot issue capping how much clinics can charge for kidney dialysis. The Ohio Supreme Court says signatures were gathered for the Kidney Dialysis Patient Protection Amendment without the proper paperwork.

The Ohio Supreme Court ruled a California company working for the issue’s backers didn’t fill out the required disclosure forms before paid workers gathered signatures.  

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OHIO CHANNEL

The Ohio Supreme Court has likely dealt the final blow to what was the state’s largest online charter school, ruling the state could base funding for the Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow on student participation, not enrollment.

The ruling means the Ohio Department of Education can continue clawing back what started as $80 million from ECOT. The state says that’s money ECOT received for students who weren’t participating in class.

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DAN KONIK / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Opponents are fighting back against a statewide ballot measure that would reduce the penalties for drug offenders. Under Issue 1, minor drug-related offenses would not require prison time and would prioritize  treatment instead.

Paul Pfeifer, a former Ohio Supreme Court justice, is calling Issue 1 a “horrible idea.” He claims it will weaken law enforcement and takes a bargaining chip away from judges and prosecutors.

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KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Here are your morning headlines for Friday, June 6:

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KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, June 27:

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Tim Rudell / WKSU

The Ohio Supreme Court has ruled unanimously that the state can cut funding to certain communities using traffic cameras. But the ruling may not have much of an effect.

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Tim Rudell / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Thursday, June 21:

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Cincinnati Reds

When a sports fan goes to a game and gets a free promotional item like a bobblehead, does the team have to pay taxes on that freebie? That was the question before the Ohio Supreme Court.

“Thank you for agreeing to hear this oral argument for a fun yet serious issue involving novelty items – bobbleheads.”

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WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, June 13:​

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KAREN KASLER / OHIO PUBLIC RADIO

Here are your morning headlines for Friday, June 8:

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DAN KONIK / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The Ohio Supreme Court has ruled that a city can’t be sued if a driver’s view of a stop or other traffic control sign is blocked by shrubs or plants -- unless they’re actually growing on the sign.

In 2013, Judy Pelletier ran a stop sign in Campbell near Youngstown and hit another car. She sued the city, claiming she couldn’t see the sign because of trees and shrubs in the privately owned devil strip near it.

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Johnny Silvercloud / FLICKR

Here are your morning headlines for Thursday, May 10:

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FACEBOOK

The only abortion clinic in the Toledo area has stopped performing surgical abortions, at least for now. 

The Ohio Supreme Court is not going to reconsider its decision allowing the state to revoke the license of the Capital Care Network of Toledo. Its attorney, Jennifer Branch, says surgical abortion appointments this week have been canceled, but the clinic will remain open for medication-induced abortions.

Actiivist Lynn Anderson
YouTube

The Ohio Supreme Court now says a local anti-fracking measure that was taken off the May 8th primary ballot in Youngstown must be put back on.  The court’s ruling two weeks before the election -- and after early voting had begun -- creates some problems.  

Deputy Mahoning County Board of Elections Director Thomas McCabe says the board placed a call to the Ohio Secretary of State’s office immediately after the decision for guidance on what to do. 

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TIM RUDELL / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Thursday, April 26:

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KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

The Ohio Supreme Court has ruled that cities have the right to operate traffic cameras. Now the court is deciding whether a lower court can block a plan to cut state funding to certain communities who use those cameras.

The case involves about a dozen cities and villages.

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WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Thursday, April 19:

Ohio Supreme Court
WOSU

The Ohio Supreme Court has upheld the constitutionality of Ohio’s death penalty law.  Attorneys for 54-year old Maurice Mason claimed that since the U.S. Supreme Court threw out Florida’s death penalty because it gave execution sentencing power to judges and not juries, Ohio’s law is also unconstitutional. In Ohio, judges impose the actual sentence.

DAN KONIK

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, April 18:

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MICHAEL BARERA / WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Here are your morning headlines for Friday, March 30:

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FDA

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, March 21:

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YELP

Here are your morning headlines for Tuesday, March 13:

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YELP

Here are your morning headlines for Monday, March 12:

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