Ohio Supreme Court

photo of group together speaking
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

A group of citizens is taking a complaint against the Medina County Board of Elections to the Ohio Supreme Court. Local officials invalidated signatures for a ballot initiative, but the group says those signatures were legitimate. 

Last July, Medina City Council passed a pro-LGBTQ ordinance that adds sexual orientation and gender identity as protected classes. A group that wanted voters to overturn it says about 50 signatures were wrongfully invalidated for not matching those on record.

Ohio's highest court has rejected a recommendation to allow judges throughout the state use “risk-assessment tools” to determine the amount of bail they require from defendants. 

photo of Stephen Hambley, Michael Skindell
OHIO STATEHOUSE

A proposal to allow judges to publicize a party affiliation in the general election is getting bipartisan support in the Statehouse from two Northeast Ohio lawmakers.

State Rep. Stephen Hambley (R-Brunswick) State Rep. Michael Skindell (D-Lakewood) are co-sponsoring a bill to allow judges to declare party affiliation.

Hambley says it will give voters what they need to make an informed decision.

Ohio Statehouse
CARTER ADAMS / WKSU

The battle over the energy law that starts providing subsidies to Ohio’s two nuclear power plants in 2021 might not be over. The Ohio Supreme Court agreed to decide whether opponents of the law can take it to voters.

State Attorney General Dave Yost is calling for the release of the Oregon District mass shooter’s Bellbrook-Sugarcreek student records. 

Yost filed a so-called “friend-of-the-court” brief in the Ohio Supreme Court asking it to overturn an earlier lower-court decision to keep the records private.

Yost’s brief supports a coalition of news outlets that includes Cox Media Group, Scripps, WDTN, the Cincinnati Enquirer, the Associated Press, The New York Times, CNN and ABC News that is suing to make the records public. 

photo of entrance to FirstEnergy Solutions' Perry Nuclear plant
TIM RUDELL / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Thursday, Dec. 5:

Perry Nuclear Plant
Dan Konik

The Ohio Supreme Court has dismissed a case arguing that voters can’t vote on the state's nuclear power plant bailout law. The nuclear power company argued that the rate increases were really a tax increase.

FirstEnergy Solutions, which recently changed its name to Energy Harbor, is set to get about $150 million a year in subsidies through increased rates on electric bills. That bailout was created through House Bill 6.

Ohio Supreme Court
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The fate of Ohio's new energy law could be up to the state's Supreme Court with parties arguing over two potential cases. One group is asking for more time to hold a referendum on the nuclear bailout law, and another case argues that the bill cannot be subject to a referendum in the first place. 

photo of people signing House Bill 6 referendum petitions
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

A federal judge has rejected the request from the anti-nuclear power plant bailout group to have more time to collect signatures. The group was trying to put the controversial law up for a vote on next year's ballot. 

Ohioans Against Corporate Bailouts already missed the deadline and did not collect enough signatures to trigger a referendum on the nuclear bailout law.

Ohio Supreme Court To Hear Fight Over School Takeovers

Oct 23, 2019

The Ohio Supreme Court will hear arguments Wednesday in a fight over how the state intervenes in repeatedly poor-performing school districts.

A striking member of United Auto Workers Local 1005 walks in front of the General Motors Metal Fabrication Division in Parma, Ohio Tuesday, Sep. 17, 2019.
CARTER ADAMS / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, Oct. 23:

Photo of a person vaping
LINDSAY FOX / WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, September 25:

The Ohio Supreme Court has ruled the state did not overstep its authority when it passed a law that forbids cities from placing residency requirements on workers employed by contractors doing business with those local governments.

a photo of Cecil Thomas
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Ohio lawmakers passed a law in 2006 that prevented local governments from passing any gun laws that are more restrictive than those enacted at the state level, and when cities challenged it, the Ohio Supreme Court upheld the law. Now, there’s a move afoot to change it.

Democratic Sen. Cecil Thomas is sponsoring a bill to allow cities to, once again, implement gun reforms. He said the one size fits all approach now in place isn’t working.

Chief Justice Maureen O’Connor talked about maintaining public trust in the judiciary, supporting sentencing reform, and keeping dockets moving with apps, texting and technology.

Medications
TIM RUDELL / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Monday, September 9:

a photo of the Ohio Supreme Court
DAN KONIK / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Five state employees have filed a lawsuit in federal court, claiming their rights have been violated by being required to pay union dues.

Four employees with the Ohio Department of Transportation and one with the Ohio Department of Public Safety have filed suit against two labor unions, Gov. Mike DeWine and Department of Administrative Services Director Matt Damschroder. Patrick Semmens with the National Right to Work Legal Defense Foundation said it is unconstitutional to require the workers to pay union dues.

memorial service for Dayton shooting victims
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Here are your morning headlines for Monday, August 26:

photo of high school hallway
DOM ERNEST L. GOMEZ / SHUTTERSTOCK

Here are your morning headlines for Thursday, August 22:

Photo of the Ohio Supreme Court's main courtroom
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The Ohio Supreme Court has ruled unanimously that state employees can be fired while they’re still in probationary periods.  The ruling comes in a case that was laced with presidential politics.

a photo of Judge Jennifer Brunner
STATE OF OHIO / OHIO PUBLIC TELEVISION

Some of the biggest races on the ballot next year could be for the Ohio Supreme Court. Two seats now held by Republican justices will be open. A prominent Democrat who has held statewide office says she wants one of them.

photo of Case Western Reserve University
CASE WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY

Here are your morning headlines for Tuesday, August 20:

A judge has granted the city of Dayton’s request for an injunction, putting on hold some provisions in the recently passed state transportation budget. City officials had sued the state over the provisions reducing local state government funding by every dollar generated by red light camera ticketing programs.

Dayton argued the provisions violate the city’s established right to home rule.

photo of FirstEnergy building
TIM RUDELL / WKSU

A split Ohio Supreme Court blocked a charge FirstEnergy Corp. customers have been paying since 2017, saying state regulators improperly allowed it to go forward. This charge cost customers as much as $200 million for each of those two years.

The Public Utilities Commission of Ohio and FirstEnergy argued the charge was to shore up credit so the utility could begin the very expensive grid modernization process.

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