Ohio Supreme Court

photo of FirstEnergy building
TIM RUDELL / WKSU

A split Ohio Supreme Court blocked a charge FirstEnergy Corp. customers have been paying since 2017, saying state regulators improperly allowed it to go forward. This charge cost customers as much as $200 million for each of those two years.

The Public Utilities Commission of Ohio and FirstEnergy argued the charge was to shore up credit so the utility could begin the very expensive grid modernization process.

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KEN PIORKOWSKI / FLICKR

The Ohio Supreme Court has added a new inmate to the execution schedule – though Gov. Mike DeWine has delayed four executions until a new way to carry them out is developed. 

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KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Governors and state lawmakers have struggled for decades with school funding. The Ohio Supreme Court has struck down the property-tax based funding method four times in the last 22 years. Now two lawmakers say they think they’ve finally fixed it. Their new school funding formula they say is stable, customizable and transparent.

pic of gavel, handcuffs, cash
SHUTTERSTOCK

The Ohio Supreme Court chief justice is gathering a team of experts to examine the state’s bail system. The task force will determine whether or not the system is unfair for people who are arrested but held on expensive bail before they can argue their case. 

Daniel Dew with the conservative-leaning Buckeye Institute said a high bail can keep a person in jail when it’s not necessary.

The Lordstown GM plant across the road from the TJX site
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, Feb. 27:

OHIO SUPREME COURT

Ohio's Supreme Court Chief Justice is awaiting a task force's recommendations on how to reform Ohio's bail system. Maureen O’Connor said it’s a real problem when some low-income Ohioans charged with crimes have to pay bail to be released from lockups. 

O’Connor said having to pay bail after being charged with minor infractions can turn the world upside down for some low-income Ohioans.

First Energy downtown Akron
Tim Rudell / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Friday, Jan. 25:

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TIM RUDELL / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, January 9:

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SHANE WYNN / AKRONSTOCK

Here are your morning headlines for Monday, January 7:

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DAN KONIK / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

It was a big year for the Ohio Supreme Court, with decisions on abortion, the death penalty and bobbleheads, and the final blow to what had been the state’s largest online charter school. 

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Democrats scored one historic victory on election day. Their candidate for state Supreme Court became the first African American woman to win election as a justice.

Melody Stewart from Cleveland defeated incumbent Mary DeGenaro from the Youngstown area, who was appointed to the position earlier this year.

Stewart, who has served as a judge on the Eighth District Court of Appeals, knew it would be an uphill battle.

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WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, November 7:

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STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The U.S. Supreme Court says it won’t hear a challenge to Ohio’s death penalty law in a case involving a convicted murderer and rapist from Marion.

The Supreme Court chose not to review a ruling from the Ohio Supreme Court in April that upheld the death sentence for 54-year-old Maurice Mason. Mason’s team claimed Ohio’s death penalty law had the same problems as Florida’s, which the high court had ruled unconstitutional. 

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WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Thursday, Nov. 1:

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C-SPAN

Here are your morning headlines for Monday, October 15:

Ohio State Fair
WIKIPEDIA

Here are your morning headlines for Monday, September 17: 

  • Ohio State Fair contract with operator of fatal ride;
  • Akron borrows more money for sewer project;
  • Boyfriend charged after remains of missing woman Akron found;
  • Ohio Supreme Court to decide conviction for couple who failed to receive medical care for daughter;
  • Construction project begins on State Route 8;

Ohio State Fair ends contract with operator of fatal ride

MAUREEN O'CONNOR
OHIO SUPREME COURT

The top justice of the state’s highest court is speaking out about a constitutional amendment that's on the fall ballot. Issue 1 would require low-level drug offenders be charged with misdemeanors, not felonies. Supporters say money could then go to treatment instead of crowded prisons.

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STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

What was the state’s largest online charter school has lost another round in court. It’s another blow to ECOT founder Bill Lager, who’s on the hook to pay back $60 million to the state.

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SHUTTERSHOCK

A union that intended to put a measure capping kidney dialysis costs on the Ohio ballot this fall said it isn’t giving up, despite a ruling from the state’s top court that won't allow the measure to come before voters  this November.

photo of Ohio Supreme Court
DAN KONIK / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Ohioans won’t vote this fall on a ballot issue capping how much clinics can charge for kidney dialysis. The Ohio Supreme Court says signatures were gathered for the Kidney Dialysis Patient Protection Amendment without the proper paperwork.

The Ohio Supreme Court ruled a California company working for the issue’s backers didn’t fill out the required disclosure forms before paid workers gathered signatures.  

photo of ECOT Supreme Court Case
OHIO CHANNEL

The Ohio Supreme Court has likely dealt the final blow to what was the state’s largest online charter school, ruling the state could base funding for the Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow on student participation, not enrollment.

The ruling means the Ohio Department of Education can continue clawing back what started as $80 million from ECOT. The state says that’s money ECOT received for students who weren’t participating in class.

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DAN KONIK / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Opponents are fighting back against a statewide ballot measure that would reduce the penalties for drug offenders. Under Issue 1, minor drug-related offenses would not require prison time and would prioritize  treatment instead.

Paul Pfeifer, a former Ohio Supreme Court justice, is calling Issue 1 a “horrible idea.” He claims it will weaken law enforcement and takes a bargaining chip away from judges and prosecutors.

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KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Here are your morning headlines for Friday, June 6:

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KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, June 27:

On the square in Carrollton
Tim Rudell / WKSU

The Ohio Supreme Court has ruled unanimously that the state can cut funding to certain communities using traffic cameras. But the ruling may not have much of an effect.

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