Ohio Statehouse

photo of chronic pain patients protests
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Last year, Ohio changed its rules for prescribing opioids, restricting amounts of, and circumstances under which, doctors can prescribe those narcotics. The new rules have an exemption for people who are in hospice type care for diseases like cancer. Many patients who suffer from chronic pain say the new rules are leaving them without pain relief, resulting in unintended consequences.

The 9/11 display in the past.
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Every year since 2002, the Statehouse puts out a flag memorial on the lawn to remember victims of September 11, 2001. Organizers are getting ready for this year’s display, and volunteers are being invited to help put out the flags.

Statehouse spokesman Luke Stedke said the annual display consists of 2,977 small flags on the capitol grounds – one for each of the people who perished in the terrorist attacks 17 years ago.

photo of Ohio State Fair
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Here are your morning headlines for Monday, September 10:

  • Second victim dies following 2017  Ohio State Fair ride accident;
  • Chippewa Lake under algae bloom advisory;
  • Heavy rainfall causes closures, cancellations;
  • Officials continue to investigate Cincinnati shooter's motive;
  • State medical marijuana program officially misses Sept. 8 deadline;
  • Ohio Statehouse to hold annual ghostly celebration;

Second victim dies following 2017  Ohio State Fair ride accident

photo of Rep. Emilia Sykes
OHIO HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

State Rep. Emilia Sykes is asking for Gov. John Kasich’s help.  She filed complaints with the Ohio Civil Rights Commission six weeks ago, in which she detailed her experiences of unfair treatment at security checkpoints at the Statehouse. Sykes, who is African-American, says she is being targeted because of her race and gender. The complaint is against four entities, including the Ohio House of Representatives and the Department of Public Safety. To avoid an investigation, Sykes has asked for mediation.

photo of money
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

When state agencies collect fines and penalties, they often keep that money in their own coffers. A new bill at the Statehouse would change that.

The bill would require state agencies to deposit all fines, penalties and late fees into the state’s general operating fund instead of directing those dollars into their own coffers.

The sponsor of the bill said agencies that depend on those dollars for operation would have a method of being able to get them back, if the money is proven to be necessary. 

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