Ohio Senate

LARRY OBHOF
OHIO SENATE

For the first time in four years, the Ohio Senate will have a new president. And he and the incumbent minority leader come out of this lame-duck session with a lot of work ahead of them when they return in January. 

Incoming president Larry Obhof, a Medina County Republican, has been in the Senate since 2011, and he takes over with some challenges ahead.

Photo of Janet Porter
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Backers of the so-called heartbeat bill, which would ban abortions once a fetal heartbeat is detected, are pressuring Ohio lawmakers to pass it during the lame-duck session. The chief advocate for the bill thinks lawmakers might be working behind the scenes on it.

The  heartbeat bill hasn’t moved in the Senate since it passed the House last year. But another bill that would ban abortions at 20 weeks is considered likely to pass in the lame-duck session.

photo of Walt Rooney and lawmakers
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

A new bill could allow expanded use of in-car breathalyzers for people convicted of drunken driving. Backers of the bill hope state senators will act soon on the measure.

Annie Rooney of Ross County was killed by a repeat drunk driver in 2013. Her brother Walt has been asking Ohio senators to pass what’s been called Annie’s Law, which provides incentives for requiring drunk drivers to install the devices.

Ohio Senate / Ohio Senate

There’s some leadership changes coming to the Ohio Senate for the new session beginning in January. Statehouse correspondent Jo Ingles reports.

Republican state Sen. Larry Obhof will lead the Senate next year as term-limited President Keith Faber takes a seat in the Ohio House.

photo of Keith Faber
STATE OF OHIO

A bill requiring lawmakers review the need for state commissions, boards and agencies passed the Senate along party lines today – with Republicans pushing it and Democrats pushing back. 

The bill had been dropped in May and didn’t get much attention. It hadn’t moved since its introduction –until a hearing just hours before it came to the Senate floor. Both the content and the speed of the bill had Democrats upset.

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