Ohio Republican Party

photo of Dan Gilbert
WIKIPEDIA

Here are your morning headlines for Monday, Feb. 17:

photo of a political map of ohio
OHIO SECRETARY OF STATE

The 2020 presidential election could end up being a critical one not just to the winner and his or her supporters, but also to Ohio. Buckeye state voters have picked the winning candidate in each presidential contest since 1960 – and no Republican has won the White House without winning Ohio.  The question is whether the state will do it again.

photo of Connie Spencwer holding an impeachment sign
DAN KONIK / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Ohio voters have picked the winner in each presidential contest since 1960 and no Republican has won the White House without winning Ohio. As the 2020 presidential campaigns ramp up, Democrats are fine-tuning their message to voters as they try to take back Ohio.

The 12-story Landmark building at the corner of South Main and Bowery is pictured as work goes on at the 42 million dollar Bowery redevelopment project on Wednesday, April 10, 2019 in Akron, Ohio.
MIKE CARDEW / AKRON BEACON JOURNAL

Here are your morning headlines for Friday, September 20:

Ohio's Congressional map based on the 2010 Census
SECRETARY OF STATE

The state will continue its fight to defend Ohio’s Congressional map in court, after last week’s federal court ruling that the map is unconstitutionally gerrymandered. Republicans and Democrats are at odds in the battle over it.

Ohio Democratic Party chair David Pepper said a fairly drawn map of the bellwether state of Ohio wouldn’t have 12 Republicans and 4 Democrats in every election since the map was created.

“They don't expect it to be exact but you'd expect to have not guaranteed 12-4," he said.

The leaders of Ohio’s two major parties see the state’s future political landscape differently. At a forum sponsored by the Associated Press, both said they have good reason to hope their parties will be in control in coming years. 

Ohio Republican Party Chair Jane Timken said the 2018 election proved one thing.

“I think Ohio is a center right state and we see that over and over again where Republicans have been successfully elected statewide.”

@SenKamalaHarris on Twitter

Last month, President Donald Trump headlined the Ohio Republican Party’s annual state dinner.  Now, the Ohio Democratic Party has also chosen a high-profile speaker for its annual event.

U.S. Senator Kamala Harris of California, an outspoken critic of President Donald Trump and Republicans, will speak at the Ohio Democratic Party’s annual legacy dinner. Party spokesman David DeWitt says Harris talks about issues that Democrats care about, especially in a big midterm election year.

KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The Ohio Republican Party held the biggest annual fundraising dinner in the organization’s history on Friday – headlined by President Donald Trump. There's been speculation that the Trump factor could help Democrats in this fall’s midterm elections, but guests at the dinner presented a united front.  

Donald Trump speaking at one of his rallys
KAREN KASLER / OHIO PUBLIC RADIO

President Trump is headlining the Ohio Republican Party’s annual dinner tonight, the biggest fundraising event of the year.

The event is being held at the Columbus Convention Center, where an anime convention is also underway. As guests arrived in suits and dresses, anime vistors entered  in costumes of superheroes and characters from Japanese animation.

Trump is expected to speak at 6, after visiting Nationwide Children’s Hospital with the First Lady and Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar. He also attended a fundraiser with US Senate candidate Jim Renacci. 

photo of Gov. John Kasich
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Gov. John Kasich said he won’t be at the Ohio Republican Party’s biggest annual fundraising event, which this year will feature President Trump who is both a Kasich critic and a frequent target of Kasich’s criticism

photo of President Donald Trump
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Ohio’s slate of Republican candidates on the November ballot is about to get what the party feels is a helping hand from President Donald Trump. The Ohio Republican Party announced Trump will be the headliner at this year’s state dinner, two weeks after campaigning in the 12th Congressional special election for Troy Balderson.

photo of Troy Balderson and Danny O'Connor
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Voters from around the state and nation were keeping a close eye on Tuesday’s special election for the 12th Congressional District seat in central Ohio, not only to see who would replace longtime U.S. Rep. Pat Tiberi, who resigned in January, but to gauge where voters fall in the current political climate.

Mike DeWine
DeWine/Husted Campaign

The Ohio Republican Party is feeling confident going into November’s general election after all of its endorsed statewide candidates won by large margins, starting at the top of the ticket with Mike DeWine as their gubernatorial nominee. As Statehouse correspondent Andy Chow reports, the party has a plan to reach out to voters across the spectrum.

The Ohio Republican Party says, despite all the talk of the so-called “Blue Wave,” it’s actually the GOP that’s seeing the enthusiasm from voters.

KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Both Republicans and Democrats are saying Tuesday’s vote gives them reasons to be hopeful about next year’s statewide election, which includes the race for governor. 

Ohio Democratic Party Chairman David Pepper says his party had big wins in mayor’s offices in 9 out of 10 large cities as well as success in traditionally red areas like Wilmington.

Jo Ingles

Ohio’s second longest-serving member of Congress is stepping down from his post to take a job in the private sector. Republican Pat Tiberi has been a congressman for the 12th District in central Ohio since 2001 and in those nine terms, he has carried a lot of political clout in Washington D.C.

 

 

Back in 2012, just days before the general election, Republican Pat Tiberi was in his home district, firing up the crowd for a visit from presidential candidate Mitt Romney.

photo of Rep. David LeLand
OGT / OHIO CHANNEL

Democrats in the state Legislature are supporting a new bill that would officially denounce white nationalists and neo-Nazis.

Democratic Rep. David Leland’s bill would recognize white nationalists, neo-Nazis and white supremacist groups as terrorist organizations. And it would direct police to track those groups, as they do other similar ones.

“These people are terrorists, and we need to treat them as such and we need to call them out.”

photo of Bill Lager
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The Ohio Republican Party has sent money back to a long-time GOP donor. The contributor, Bill Lager, is embroiled in controversy over the $100 million a year his online charter school has been collecting from the state. 

The Republican Party returned $76,000 in donations from Bill Lager, the founder of the Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow, or ECOT.

Photo of Vice President Mike Pence and Ohio Senator Rob Portman
Karen Kasler / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The Ohio Republican Party’s state dinner this weekend brought in hundreds of party faithful, and included two leaders with different perspectives on the Senate health care bill. And that puts the person who’ll actually be voting on it in a tough position. 

Sen. Rob Portman is undecided on the Republican bills to repeal the Affordable Care Act, something he touched on in his speech: 

“I’ve talked to a lot of you about that tonight, and half of you have told me one thing and half of you told me another thing,” Portman said.

Jane Timken
M.L. Schultze / WKSU public radio

In her speech to the City Club in Cleveland today , Ohio GOP Chairman Jane Timken called Donald Trump a great president, quoted Richard Nixon, and named the entire slate of Republican statewide candidates in next year’s elections. But as WKSU’s M.L. Schultze reports, the speech itself did not raise the name of Ohio’s Republican standard-bearer, Gov. John Kasich.

photo of Lake Erie
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Lawmakers on Capitol Hill are sifting through President Donald Trump’s budget proposal, which has gotten a lot of heat from Democrats. There’s one issue that has riled up some of Ohio’s leaders on both sides of the aisle.

The White House’s budget proposes eliminating the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, which works to clean the lakes and protect them from long-term threats.

Photo of Sen. Cliff Rosenberger.
Karen Kasler / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The Republicans who run the House will soon release their version of Gov. John Kasich’s budget. But before that, they’ll put out a list of their priority agenda items for this two-year session. 

House Speaker Cliff Rosenberger of Clarksville says what’s called the Buckeye Pathway will outline the top issues for the Republican caucus better than the previous system has done.

photo of Jane Timken
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The Ohio Republican Party’s recent change in leadership is being hailed as a victory by Tea Party Republicans who support President-elect Donald Trump. But at least one political scientist thinks it could be good for Democrats in Ohio.

The Republican Liberty Caucus of Ohio says newly elected Ohio Republican Party Chair Jane Timken can now take on issues that weren't pushed hard under former Chair Matt Borges. Among those: making Ohio a right-to-work state and cutting the budget and regulations. 

photo of Jane Timken
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The Ohio Republican Party has a new leader.

Matt Borges, who has chaired the party for nearly four years, has been replaced with Stark County attorney, party official and fundraiser Jane Timken, who had the backing of President Elect Donald Trump

The Battle Between Trump and Kasich Plays Out in Ohio Friday

Jan 4, 2017
photo of Borges and Sen. Rob Portman
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Ordinarily, if a presidential candidate were to win the battleground state of Ohio by a fairly sizeable margin of 446,841 votes out of slightly more than 7.8 million cast, you might think that candidate and his political party in Ohio would be on very good terms.

That margin of victory for Donald Trump is the largest for a GOP presidential candidate in Ohio since George H.W. Bush in 1988.

Ohio Republicans should be dancing in the streets.

Photo of Tom Zawistowski
"THE STATE OF OHIO" / OHIO PUBLIC TELEVISION

Ohio Republican Party Chairman Matt Borges and Jane Timken, the Stark County Republican who wants to unseat him, are lining up their supporters as they go into the party’s leadership vote next month.

One conservative leader who opposed Borges before is firmly behind the challenger.

Portage County Tea Party leader Tom Zawistowski tried and failed to beat Borges for the party’s chairman position in 2013. He got support from a small but vocal wing of the party.

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