Ohio primary

Author David Giffels spent a year traveling around Ohio with the idea that by getting a better understanding of Ohio, he might get a better understanding of the nation as a whole this election year. The people he encountered in his journeys and what he learned from them are in his new book, "Barnstorming Ohio: To Understand America." Giffels said he wrapped up his research just as the coronavirus pandemic shut down the state and the country. 

GOOGLE EARTH

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, May 13:

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, April 29:

PRELIMARY PRIMARY RESULTS:

  • Stark Parks levy approved;
  • School levies for Stark, Summit and Cuyahoga counties;
  • Cuyahoga County health and human services levy passes;
  • Summit County Metro Parks levy gains support;
  • Biden is the winner in Ohio's primary;
  • Notable Congressional seat races;

COVID-19 UPDATES:

Summit County Voters Approve Metro Parks Levy

Apr 29, 2020
a photo of Springfield Bog Metro Park
SUMMIT METRO PARKS

Summit County voters resoundingly approved a 2-mill levy for Summit Metro Parks.

The tax is a renewal and an increase. Homeowners currently pay $3.47 per month for a home valued at $100,000. This levy will raise that rate by $1.58 per month.

Summit Metro Parks spokeswoman Stephanie Walton said the funding this levy provides is essential for them to continue operating.

Former Vice President Joe Biden has won Ohio's Democratic presidential primary. See live results below.

a photo of Summit county ballot drop box
SARAH TAYLOR / WKSU

Ohio is wrapping up an unprecedented primary day. The state canceled scheduled voting over concerns about the coronavirus hours before polls were to open on March 17, the originally scheduled primary election day. The legislature opted not to schedule another day of full in-person voting. Instead it called on the Secretary of State to implement voting by mail. 

2020 Ohio Primary Results: Congressional Races

Apr 28, 2020

It's Election Day in Ohio, although things look a little bit different this year. Below, find results for Ohio's U.S. House primary races.

a polling place
DAN KONIK / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Today is the last day to cast a ballot in Ohio’s 2020 presidential primary. In person voting on March 17 was postponed and absentee voting was extended. Statehouse correspondent Jo Ingles reports.

This election, like many things these days, is unprecedented. Voters who didn’t cast ballots before March 17th were instructed to vote by mail. But Mike Brickner with All Voting is Local says his group is hearing from confused voters who didn’t get their ballots in the mail or didn’t understand the voting process.

Today is the last day to cast a ballot in Ohio’s 2020 presidential primary. In person voting on March 17 was postponed and absentee voting was extended.

a photo of a drop box at the Summit County Board of Elections
SARAH TAYLOR / WKSU

More than 1.6 million Ohioans requested mail-in ballots ahead of Tuesday's primary election. But boards of elections across the state are still expecting some voters to cast provisional ballots in person.

photo of Akron Children's Hospital
/ WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Friday, April 24:

A voting rights organization says there are potentially a lot fewer voters who will cast ballots this year compared to the presidential primary four years ago. The group looked at totals so far for the March 17 primary that has been extended to April 28.

photo of vote sign outside Hudson polling station
ANDREW MEYER / WKSU

Ohio’s rescheduled primary is set to wrap up April 28. It was originally supposed to happen March 17, but the coronavirus pandemic led to the last-minute cancellation of in-person voting. The question that still has many people confused is: If you hadn’t already participated through early voting, how do you follow through now?

 

The presidential race has crystallized to a contest between President Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden, after Sen. Bernie Sanders (D-Vt.) ended his bid Wednesday. 

Ohio lawmakers created the new vote-by-mail timeline after in-person voting on Election Day was canceled over coronavirus concerns but voter rights advocates fear the deadline of April 28 still does not give people enough time to cast a ballot.

CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION

Here are your morning headlines for Tuesday, March 31:

The bill that made some changes across state law related to coronavirus also set a new ending for the Ohio primary, after polling places were shut down just hours before election day.

a photo of Voting Machines
DAN KONIK / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Election eve was confusing. An announcement earlier in the day stated Ohio's March 17 primary was still on. But that afternoon, Gov. Mike DeWine said he was going to get a court to postpone it until June 2. 

The court refused to do that. So later that evening, DeWine had Ohio Department of Health Director Dr. Amy Acton issue an order to close the polls on Election Day. 

The coronavirus outbreak has already led Georgia and Louisiana to postpone upcoming primary elections, but leaders in four states — Arizona, Florida, Illinois and Ohio — that vote on Tuesday say they will continue as planned.

Here are your morning headlines for Friday, March 13: 

Summit County Board of Elections

Concerns about the spread of COVID-19 have led Ohio Secretary of State Frank LaRose to order that voting locations in retirement living or senior care facilities be moved for primary election day next Tuesday.To safeguard seniors, the Summit County Board of Elections moved 10 polling locations out of senior housing facilities, affecting nearly 11,000 voters.  

To inform voters, bright orange post cards were mailed to each voter in the affected precincts.

Election workers also delivered absentee ballots to the facilities, because manyof the  residents have 

hospital
sfam_photo / Shutterstock

Here are your morning headlines for Thursday, March 5: 

photo of early voters in Stark County
WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Tuesday, Feb. 18:

photo of Frank LaRose at a podium
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The state’s chief elections officer is criticizing President Trump and other key figures for sharing rumors and false information related to voting, recently about the Iowa caucuses but going all the way back to the 2016 election. This comes as Ohioans prepare to start early voting in two weeks for the presidential primary in March.

Republican Secretary of State Frank LaRose said posting conspiracy theories about voting that cast doubt on the fairness and accuracy of U.S. elections shouldn’t be tolerated – no matter where it comes from.

a photo of a Trump rally
CSPAN

It’s been said many times, and will be repeated often in 2020 – no Republican has won the White House without winning Ohio. As the presidential campaigns get going, Republicans and campaign staffers for President Trump say they have one common message to voters as they try to win Ohio again.

The Trump campaign’s goal is to push a message that focuses on what they see as the President’s accomplishments in improving the economy.

Pages