Ohio EPA

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Here are your morning headlines for Monday, April 29:

Cuyahoga River dredging
Port of Cleveland

Here are your morning headlines for Tuesday, March 19:

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ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Here are your morning headlines for Thursday, March 14: 

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Here are your morning headlines for Monday, Feb. 18:

ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The saga to implement tougher water quality standards to stop algae blooms in Lake Erie goes on. A state commission has decided once again to delay an order issued by the governor this summer. 

The Ohio Soil and Water Conservation Commission split over its vote to delay Gov. John Kasich’s executive order on watersheds in western Ohio.

That order would create tougher regulations to keep fertilizer from running off farm land and into the Lake Erie basin.

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IBERDROLA RENEWABLES

Here are your morning headlines for Tuesday, July 31:

  • Ohio EPA approves wind turbine project;
  • Gov. Kasich signs payday lending bill;
  • Cultivator license awarded to Eastlake med pot business;
  • Canton pushes Market Square project forward;
  • Baldwin Wallace strips theater building namesakes amid allegations;
  • Ohio University drops ban on spontaneous protests;
  • Three charged in Cleveland construction site scam;

Ohio EPA approves wind turbine project

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ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Farmers are firing back at Gov. John Kasich’s executive order to implement tougher regulations on fertilizer and other farm runoff. The administration says these new requirements will help keep nutrients from polluting Lake Erie. But farmers argue this creates mandates for a problem they’re already trying to fix.

The health of Lake Erie is at the center of a debate playing out at the Statehouse.

JEFF ST.CLAIR / WKSU

The U.S. EPA is moving ahead with the next phase of removing the largest remaining dam on the Cuyahoga River. Federal, state, and local agencies are paving the way for the most complicated part of the process.

The massive dam – part of a former hydroelectric generator – holds 832,000 cubic feet of contaminated sediment behind it.

And all that muck need to be moved before the concrete dam comes down.

photo of Lake Erie
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

More than $20 million could soon be pumped into projects that help keep Lake Erie clean. Most of that money would help fund equipment that limits nutrient runoff from farmland. But there are state leaders and environmental advocates who say that’s not good enough.

The bill would increase funding for voluntary projects that battle harmful algae blooms in the Lake Erie watershed. Ohio EPA Director Craig Butler argues data shows that the voluntary programs aren’t doing enough.

photo of Lake Erie
NASA

Gov. John Kasich found himself in some hot water after saying in a recent speech that he doesn’t believe Lake Erie is impaired, contradicting a declaration from his own Environmental Protection Agency in March. Now Kasich is clarifying those comments. 

Kasich told the Michigan Press Association convention last weekend that the open waters of Lake Erie aren’t impaired and shouldn’t have that designation. He now says he fears environmentalists may have taken his comments out of context.

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DISCOVERY TOURS

Here are your morning headlines for Tuesday, May 8:

WKSU

The Ohio Environmental Protection Agency is asking for broad public input on its plan to have the open waters of western Lake Erie declared impaired under the federal Clean Water Act.  And a leading group opposed to the state agency’s decision is encouraging its supporters to offer feedback, too.

WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Monday, April 23:

CLIFF ROSENBERGER
STATE OF OHIO

Here are your morning headlines for Friday, April 13:

Ohio EPA Calls Western Lake Erie 'Impaired'

Mar 23, 2018
Lake Erie
Elizabeth Miller / Ideastream

The Ohio Environmental Protection Agency has decided to include Western Lake Erie in a list of impaired waters -- due to the harmful algae blooms that plague the region every year. As Great Lakes Today’s Elizabeth Miller reports, the agency’s move comes after years of calls from environmentalists and a federal lawsuit.

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Here are your morning headlines for Friday, March 23:

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STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, Feb. 28:

Jounson Controls Hall of Fame Village website

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STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Here are your morning headlines for Tuesday, Feb. 6:

Akron downtown
TIM RUDELL / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Tuesday, Jan. 23:

Pipeline sections
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU

Correction: There's no evidence that nearly 150,000 gallons of drilling fluid Rover pipeline builders lost down a hole beneath the Tuscarawas River entered wetlands. No one has yet established where it went. Energy Transfer Partners maintains, "We are continuing to work through the process, and we are working in coordination with FERC on all of the remaining HDDs and are in compliance with the HDD contingency plan that was approved by FERC."

Here are your morning headlines for Monday, Jan. 22:

Kaptur applauds decision to reject the Ohio EPA's list of impaired waters

Jan 19, 2018
Algae Bloom seen from Lake Erie
NOAA / GLERL

Congresswoman Marcy Kaptur applauds the U.S. EPA’s recent decision to withdraw acceptance of the Ohio EPA’s assessment of impaired waterways. The federal agency changed its mind because the assesssment did not account for Lake Erie’s open waters.

photo of Lake Erie
JEFF ST. CLAIR / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Thursday, Jan. 18:

Pipeline sections
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU

Update: The company building the Rover pipeline maintains the loss of the nearly 150,000 gallons of drilling fluid is not a spill and says it is continuing to work through the process, and we are working in coordination with FERC on all of the remaining HDDs and are in compliance with the HDD contingency plan that was approved by FERC. "  

The $4.2 billion Rover pipeline cutting diagonally across Ohio is drawing more concern from state regulators. WKSU’s M.L. Schultze has more on a letter the state wrote last week about a new spill.

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