Ohio energy law

Ohio Supreme Court
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The fate of Ohio's new energy law could be up to the state's Supreme Court with parties arguing over two potential cases. One group is asking for more time to hold a referendum on the nuclear bailout law, and another case argues that the bill cannot be subject to a referendum in the first place. 

photo of carbon emissions
JAMES KELLEY / SHUTTERSTOCK

Working to support wind and solar has become almost standard in states nationwide. Some are even phasing out coal, but not Ohio. It recently passed a law doubling down on subsidies for power plants.  

photo of Perry nuclear plant
DAN KONIK / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Opponents of Ohio's new energy law are not giving up on efforts to have voters consider the legislation. Attorney General Dave Yost denied their first attempt at a ballot initiative, but the group says it will rewrite the language.  

Yost identified what he described as 21 inaccuracies in the summary language that held a referendum on Ohio's new energy law, which creates subsidies for two coal plants, solar farms and gives FirstEnergy Solutions $150 million a year to keep its Perry and Davis-Besse nuclear power plants operating.