OH really?

kayakers in the Cuyahoga River
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

Heavy rain this spring pushed local waterways to higher-than normal levels, and listener Patrick Pierquet from Wooster asks “OH Really?” how that could affect wildlife.

photo of FreshMark plant
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

One year ago, immigration agents raided a Salem meat processing facility and arrested more than 140 undocumented immigrants. In this installment of “OH Really,” a listener asks for an update.

Debbie Toder from West Akron said she felt terrible when she heard about the U.S. Immigrations and Customs Enforcement raids at the FreshMark facility.

a photo of a FirstEnergy substation
SARAH TAYLOR / WKSU

State lawmakers have been debating a change to Ohio’s energy policy that could save two nuclear plants. Both are owned by First Energy Solutions, once a subsidiary of First Energy. But First Energy has shed the entity and become a fully-regulated utility, which sparked a listener’s curiosity. She sent in a question to our OH Really? team.

trucks use left lane sign
SARAH TAYLOR / WKSU

It’s orange barrel season and one of our listeners asked our OH Really team an interesting question about sharing the road in construction zones.

We helped him find the answer.

On route 8 in northern Summit County, traffic has been reduced to two lanes in each direction and concrete barriers are set up as crews resurface a six mile section of the road. There are signs throughout the construction zone that illustrate listener Seth Marks’ concern.  

photo of Paul Pickett
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

Roundabouts have been gaining popularity in Northeast Ohio over the past decade, even if the public doesn’t always consider them to be a well-rounded solution. 

A listener asked “OH Really?” to find out about the evidence that they're safer than traditional intersections. We looked into the circular logic to see if it is a better way to make traffic go-round.

photo of Smokey the Bear
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

Northeast Ohio has not one, not two, but three park systems that comprise about 70,000 acres of land – and almost 10 times that is protected throughout the state.

Listeners have asked our "OH Really?" project how these parks got started. WKSU’s Sarah Taylor and Kabir Bhatia answer some of their questions.

photo of Goodyear Building Room
THE BUILDING ROOM / GOODYEAR TIRE AND RUBBER CO. RECORDS, ARCHIVAL SERVICES, UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES, UNIVERSITY OF AKRON

Firestone Country Club, Goodyear Heights and the B.F. Goodrich smokestacks are among the many reminders that the rubber industry once dominated the eyes, ears and nose of almost every Akronite. 

But why did the industry take root here, thousands of miles from the nearest rubber tree and hundreds of miles from the auto industry?

photo of First Ladies National Historic Site
FIRST LADIES NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE

The National Park Service is expanding its presence at the First Ladies National Historic Site in Canton. The site had been closed during the government shutdown but will reopen on Friday.

BRYN PINZGAUER / FLICKR/CC

Have you heard your house making strange, loud noises during the recent bitter cold weather? One of our listeners has and submitted a question about it to our new reporting project “OH Really?” Russell Stanton says he’s lived in Ohio for 61 years and has rarely heard noises like this. 

Peter Paino from Paino Architects in Kent says he's heard them in his house too. He says it’s likely the top quarter of your roof truss or the roof rafters. When it’s so cold like this, they shrink rapidly and move.  

photo of vegan donuts
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

Have you heard of the Summit Food Coalition? It’s been growing rapidly for the past year under its first full-time executive director. This week, “OH Really?” explains the coalition’s mission to help feed Northeast Ohio.

We want to hear your questions for our new series, "OH really?"   

You send us questions. We’ll seek out the answers.