Nickie Antonio

two pills.
MIKE ROGAL / SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

The Ohio Senate has sent to the House two controversial abortion bills. One involves abortion reversal, a practice that is not backed by mainstream medical professionals.

The other subjects doctors to steep penalties for failing to deal with aborted remains in a particular way. 

State Sen. Peggy Lehner (R-Kettering) says women can reverse a two-step medication abortion by taking progesterone instead of a second pill. She says her bill requires doctors to tell women about it.

pregnancy test, handcuffs
HOWARD KLAASTE / SHUTTERSTOCK

A bill to ban prison guards from shackling pregnant inmates seems to be gaining momentum after clearing another hurdle in a Senate committee. Supporters say this is a common sense bill that shows more humanity towards inmates.

The amended bill now bans restraining pregnant inmates throughout their whole pregnancy instead of just the third trimester.

Shackles can feature a chain that goes from handcuffs, around the waist, and down around the ankles.

Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost has joined a U.S. Supreme Court case siding with states that think federal civil rights laws do not protect LGBTQ employees from workplace discrimination.

That news came as a shock to some activists, but was well received by others. 

Sen. Nickie Antonio (D-Lakewood) is disappointed – to say the least.

“Our attorney general has entered into weighing in and support of a push to discriminate against a group of people. That is appalling,” Antonio said.

photo of a private jet
MULTISHARE / SHUTTERSTOCK

The Ohio House’s two year state budget repeals tax breaks for personal aircraft or private planes. Now Senators are being urged to remove that provision by an official from one of Ohio’s two companies offering part ownership of private jets.

The Executive Vice President of fractional jet company Net Jets, Bradley Ferrell urged senators to think twice.

STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Backers of gender equality legislation that’s been proposed again in Ohio say they are making slow headway in getting the civil rights protection they think the bill would afford them.

Alana Jochum with Equality Ohio says civil rights protections for LGBTQ Ohioans are being passed in Ohio’s cities, including recently in Cleveland.

“We have gone from 14 percent of Ohioans from having access to a remedy to 27 percent.”  

JO INGLES / Statehouse News Bureau

The Human Rights Campaign estimates there are 1.8 million LGBTQ Ohioans and their allies. A campaign is underway to get those voters to the polls next month, with key statewide races and Ohio’s Congressional delegation on the ballot.

photo of Nickie Antonio
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Critics of Ohio’s so-called Parent’s Rights Bill say the legislation will only hurt transgender children in the state.

The bill, which has received national attention, would allow parents to deny treatment for their transgender children. It also requires teachers, school counselors and health care providers to “out” transgender children to their parents.

photo of Bill Seitz
OGT

Two Democratic women state representatives have asked Attorney General and Republican candidate for governor Mike DeWine to reopen an investigation into comments made by the Majority Floor Leader at a going-away party in January.

They’re concerned not only about the alleged conduct of Rep. Bill Seitz, but with a previous investigation that cleared him of wrongdoing.

photo of Kathleen Clyde, Michelle Lapor-Hagan, Teresa Fedor and Nickie Antonio
SHANE WALKER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Four Democratic women in the Ohio Legislature are calling on the head of the Ohio House to take action against a key Republican lawmaker for derogatory comments he recently made at a going away party for a former staffer.

Speaker Cliff Rosenberger says Rep. Bill Seitz has admitted he shouldn’t have mocked some women lawmakers.

“He’s apologized for it.”

Rosenberger wants a bipartisan focus group to take on the broader subject of sexual harassment “to make sure we are listening and hearing it out.”

photo of Nickie Antonio
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The bill to protect LGBTQ people from housing and employment discrimination is expected to take a big step as a committee prepares to hear from a major supporter, the Ohio Chamber of Commerce. The bill also seems to be getting support from the top House leader.

For the first time in nearly 10 years, the bill to protect people from discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender identity will get a second hearing.

Nickie Antonio
ANDY CHOW / STATE OF OHIO

Two Republican state lawmakers have issued apologies for disparaging remarks they made earlier this week at a roast for a departing employee. But some lawmakers are demanding more than apologies. Statehouse correspondent Jo Ingles reports they want a change in the culture they say is prevalent in Ohio's statehouse.

Photo of Nickie Antonio
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

A Democratic  bill that would protect LGBTQ Ohioans from employment and housing discrimination has been floating around the Statehouse for more than 10 years, and has gonenowhere. Its backer weighed in on whether she thinks it's time to go to the ballot.

Democratic Rep. Nickie Antonio says adding the protections will make Ohio more attractive to people and businesses looking to move.

photo of Nickie Antonio
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

A Democratic state lawmaker says if Ohio wants to become more appealing as a place to move a business or family, it must create protections for LGBTQ people. There could be new momentum for a bill that has stalled several times in the last decade.

photo of Nickie Antonio
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

A bill that would ban discrimination in housing or employment based on sexual gender or identity has been introduced in the legislature. 

Democratic Rep. Nickie Antonio says this legislation is not new.

“A version of this bill has been introduced in the general assembly in the state of Ohio, since 2009.”

KAREN KASLER / OPR

There still may be questions of party unity for the Democrats coming out of their national convention, but on one issue, the party seems to be very united – LGBTQ rights. 

Jim Obergefell of Cincinnati announced the votes for Hillary Clinton during the roll call of states at the convention this week.

The man who was the lead plaintiff in the lawsuit that brought marriage equality to the nation says there’s no question the Democratic Party is unified on this issue.

KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

While people are still reeling in the aftermath of the mass shooting in Orlando, leaders in Ohio say it’s time to add more protections for the LGBT community. 

When responding to the brutal attack at a gay nightclub in Florida that left 49 people dead and dozens of others wounded, President Barack Obama declared an act of terror and of hate.

 Janine Boyd and Nickie Antonio
OHIO PUBLIC RADIO

A northeast Ohio man accused of shooting and killing his wife and then himself had been ordered by a judge to stay away from her after threatening to kill her. Now some Democratic state lawmakers are urging passage of a bill they say would make it harder for people convicted of domestic violence to own guns.

Democratic Rep. Nickie Antonio of Lakewood says her proposal would force people convicted of domestic violence to turn their guns over to authorities.