neomed

photo of the incoming and outgoing presidents of NEOMED
JEFF ST.CLAIR / WKSU

The Northeast Ohio Medical University (NEOMED) has introduced its next president.

NEOMED announced Wednesday that Dr. John Langell will replace outgoing president Dr. Jay Gershen, who retires in September.

Langell is currently vice dean of the University of Utah School of Medicine and a former Air Force medical commander.

He also has an interest in medical innovation, with more than a dozen patents.

NEOMED, Bio-Med Science Academy Break Ground for New Building

Apr 29, 2019
NEOMED

Construction is underway at Northeast Ohio Medical University (NEOMED) and Bio-Med Science Academy on a new four-story building at the Rootstown campus. 

The facility will be used for training for middle and high school students, health care professionals and first responders.

Bio-Med Chief Administrative Officer Stephanie Lammlein said the $24-million project will allow the independent STEM school to move 7th and 8th graders from an offsite facility to the NEOMED campus.

photo of downtown Canton, Ohio
TIM RUDELL / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Friday, January 8:

OHIO HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Here are your morning headlines for Friday, October 5:

photo of computer
SHUTTERSTOCK / SHUTTERSTOCK

Kent State University is helping the Northeast Ohio Medical University bring online programs to its graduate students.

The two universities have signed an agreement to share digital services, including design, video hosting and course management.

NEOMED spokesman Roderick Ingram said the online option expands the reach of the school.

JEFF ST.CLAIR / WKSU

There’s a summer program in Northeast Ohio that offers hands-on experience with the cadavers used by medical students.

The Northeast Ohio Medical University in Rootstown is opening up its anatomy labs to community members who want to learn more about the human body.

The pace of the program is blistering.

A human brain, beige and lumpy, sits on a bright blue tray as second-year medical student Trey Moberly dives into its structures.

Photo of Peggy and Diane Mang
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU public radio

Nearly 60 years ago, mental-health treatment began its move from massive warehouses like the old Massillon State Hospital to community-based care. But the path to effective treatment continues to face challenges: from old stereotypes to new medications. In the third installment of our series, “Navigating the Path to Mental Health,” WKSU’s M.L. Schultze explores the evolution among providers, advocates and patients.

Photo of NELMED Grand Ballroom Foyer
TIM RUDELL / WKSU

Peg’s Foundation, formerly the Margaret Clark Morgan Foundation, is giving $7.5 million to the Department of Psychiatry at Northeast Ohio Medical University. 

It’s believed to be the largest single grant ever given specifically for mental health treatment studies by a private foundation in Ohio.

JEFF ST.CLAIR / WKSU

No one knows what causes schizophrenia. It’s a devastating mental disorder that affects more than 3 million Americans.

And while most people with schizophrenia can be treated, many don’t respond to medications.

New research may find ways to help them.

In this week’s Exploradio, we examine how genetic research is providing clues to the unsolved mysteries of schizophrenia.

photo of PCRM ad campaign
PHYSICIANS FOR RESPONSIBLE MEDICINE

The Cleveland Clinic’s South Pointe Hospital will end its involvement with a program that allowed some residents to practice surgery on live dogs.

Earlier this week, a national non-profit group called the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine placed four billboards in Northeast Ohio calling for an end to the program.

Dr. John Pippin is the group’s director of academic affairs.

Ralph and Mary Regula
MARK URYCKI / WKSU

One of the longest-serving Ohioans in Congress is being remembered as a proud Republican, yet nonpartisan public servant. Ralph Regula, who represented Northeast Ohio for 36 years, died Wednesday in his home. He was 92.

'A good man'
People remembering Ralph Regula quickly get to two points.

“He was an exceptional person;” and “he got things done.” 

Ralph Regula park
NATIONAL PARK SERVICE

Ralph Regula -- a farmer, teacher, lawyer and one of Ohio’s longest-serving congressman – has died at age 92. WKSU’s M.L. Schultze has more on the man known for his geniality and constituent service.

Regula’s trademark during his 36 years in Congress was helping his constituents navigate the federal bureaucracy. It’s something he remained proud of right through his retirement in 2008.

DANIEL PINK / FLICKR CC

Bats are the only flying mammal. 

But that's just one of a long list of bats' unique attributes, including an unusually long life and the ability to avoid the effects of aging.

In this week’s Exploradio, WKSU’s Jeff St.Clair meets local researchers searching for the fountain of youth by studying bats.

A bat sees with sound. It sends out high frequency chirps, and then listens for the faint echo of a leaf, a telephone wire or a tasty mosquito.

BERNIE CASPER / FLICKR CC

More than five million Americans suffer from Alzheimer’s Disease.

And according to the Alzheimer’s Association, that number could double in the next two decades as baby boomers age and people live longer.

Despite massive research efforts, we still don’t know the root causes of the disease or how to treat it.

That’s why local researchers are looking in new directions to solve the mystery of Alzheimer’s, as WKSU’s Jeff St.Clair reports in this week’s Exploradio.

FLICKR CC

A 4,000 year-old medical tradition from India is the inspiration for a local researcher who’s looking for new ways to treat and prevent arthritis. 

In the lab he’s unlocking the healing properties of herbs, fruits, and flowers.

In this week’s Exploradio, WKSU’s Jeff St.Clair explores how modern science is revealing the ancient secrets of Ayurveda.

photo of opioids
DIMITRIS KALOGEROPOYLOS / FLICKR

Over the last two decades, about 2 million people in the U.S. became addicted to opioids after being prescribed pain killers following an injury or illness. The National Institute on Drug Abuse and other studies say an increased emphasis on pain-management two decades ago contributed to an increased reliance on prescribing opioids.

JEFF ST.CLAIR / WKSU

Gene therapy was once viewed as a promising new way to treat many incurable diseases -- until a tragic death occurred during a clinical trial. It’s taken nearly two decades for the industry to recover, but now several Northeast Ohio researchers are once again developing DNA as medicine.

In this week’s Exploradio, WKSU’s Jeff St.Clair looks at the science and business of gene therapy.

We’re in the auditory lab at NEOMED with researcher Hui Li. He points to a computer image of colored dots lining a small section of a mouse’s inner ear.

JEFF ST.CLAIR / WKSU

A national organization that promotes scientific research says a recent survey shows Ohioans approve of more government spending on basic discovery efforts.

photo of Jack Horner
JEFF ST.CLAIR

 

Not all dinosaurs went extinct 65 million years ago. In fact, they’re still all around us. Birds are dinosaurs, and evidence for that toothy ancestry is growing.

In this week’s Exploradio, WKSU’s Jeff St.Clair explores local efforts to understand the dino/avian connection, and a plan to engineer a very early bird.

In the first Jurassic Park movie, a flock of ostrich-like dinosaurs race past when suddenly a giant T-Rex leaps out and snags one.

HANS THEWISSEN / NEOMED

A new book by an Ohio author unravels what used to be one of the greatest mysteries of science. It’s the story of how whales and dolphins came to be fully adapted to aquatic life. 

In this week’s Exploradio, WKSU’s Jeff St.Clair talks with the fossil hunter who traces the path whales walked in their journey from land to the sea.