Mueller Report

Updated at 1:14 p.m. ET

Special counsel Robert Mueller stepped down Wednesday after concluding not only one of the highest-profile investigations in recent history, but one of the most distinctive codas in the career of any top Washington official.

Mueller addressed reporters at the Justice Department in his first public statement since taking over the Russia investigation, ending two years of near-silence even under one of the hottest spotlights ever to burn on a public figure.

When a redacted version of special counsel Robert Mueller's report on Russian interference in the 2016 election was released to the public and Congress on Thursday, the effects of Russian influence efforts through social media became clearer.

Part of the information in the report included examples of material that Russian trolls used, and one particular image stood out to Ronnie Hipshire, a retired coal miner in West Virginia.

Attorney General William Barr has released a redacted version of special counsel Robert Mueller's report on Russian interference in the 2016 election to Congress and the public.

The special counsel spent nearly two years investigating attacks on the 2016 presidential election and whether the Trump campaign coordinated with the Russians behind it.

Updated at 7:24 p.m. ET

When President Trump learned two years ago that a special counsel had been appointed to investigate Russian interference in the 2016 election, he was distraught.

Trump "slumped back in his chair and said, 'Oh my God. This is terrible. This is the end of my presidency. I'm f***ed,' " according to the report by special counsel Robert Mueller that was released Thursday in redacted form.

Updated April 12, 2019, at 9:12 p.m. ET

Updated March 18, 2019

What are "active measures"?

The Russian government launched a broad influence campaign against the United States starting in 2014. Intelligence professionals call it the latest examples of "active measures," secret tools of statecraft that have been used for centuries and were employed throughout the Cold War.

In recent years they have included many interlocking elements:

Updated April 3, 2019

No charges for Trump

President Trump won't be facing criminal charges arising from allegations that he obstructed justice, Attorney General William Barr told Congress on March 24, 2019.

Why was that an issue? How did Barr reach that decision? Why was this such good news for the president? Here's what you need to know.

What is obstruction of justice?

Updated on June 13, 2018, at 9:36 p.m. ET

Two months after a book tour that saw his face plastered on network television, former FBI Director James Comey will be in the spotlight again with significantly less control of the narrative.

Thursday, the Justice Department's inspector general, Michael Horowitz, is expected to release his report regarding his investigation into Comey's handling of the 2016 Hillary Clinton email probe.