medicaid expansion

A stock photo of stethoscope and chart.
PIXABAY

The state is starting the process that will eventually require thousands of Ohioans in Medicaid expansion to work 20 hours a week or lose their benefits, after getting permission from the federal government earlier this year. But advocates for Medicaid expansion still have big concerns about how this will work and how many people will be kicked out of the program.

Ohio Medicaid Director Maureen Corcoran said no one’s just going to get a letter saying they’ve lost their health care through Medicaid expansion.

a photo of protestors in support of Medicaid expansion
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Ohio could soon be imposing work requirements for Medicaid expansion recipients, but a nonprofit law firm thinks it might not be worth it.

If imposed, recipients would have to work at least 20 hours per week, unless they are older than 50 years old, are caregivers, or are disabled.

Steven McGarrity, executive director at Community Legal Aid in Akron, says the law firm is reaching out to residents in eight counties, including Portage and Summit, about the work requirements.

photo of Lisa Hamler Fugitt
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

A new report by a coalition of social service groups says state leaders need to invest in families, Ohio’s seniors and the poorest in the state when they approve the next two-year state budget.

Over the years, Kasich has brought forward a lot of ideas, and his tone has changed dramatically, as he’s worked to accomplish his goals and create a national persona as a Trump critic and a promoter of bipartisan compromise - with mixed results.

photo of Rich Cordray
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Some 750 doctors said they’re endorsing Democrat for governor Richard Cordray, breaking with the Ohio State Medical Association, which is backing his Republican opponent Mike DeWine. The doctors split over protections for people with pre-existing health conditions.

Cordray said he’ll work to lower insurance premiums and drug costs, and to protect millions of Ohioans with pre-existing conditions. And he notes that as attorney general DeWine filed a lawsuit against the Affordable Care Act or Obamacare, which guarantees those protections.

photo of Brenda Jean Searcy
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Gov. John Kasich continues to be concerned about the future of Medicaid expansion, even though he’s out of office in five months. He’s defending the program he pushed past skeptical state lawmakers in 2013 through a new study and through people who are in it.

photo of Richard Cordray
DAN KONIK / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Democratic gubernatorial nominee Rich Cordray is doubling down on his support for Medicaid expansion and its economic viability. Cordray, along with Gov. John Kasich's administration, says the program is sustainable and needs to remain consistent.

photo of John Kasich and Barbara Sears
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

An argument is brewing in the race to become Ohio’s next governor. Medicaid expansion has been a crucial topic in the campaign with both candidates, Mike DeWine and Rich Cordray, who are taking different approaches to the issue. One piece of the debate is over whether the expansion is sustainable.

Republican candidate DeWine is now saying firmly that he wants to keep Medicaid expansion, although he argues that it’s unsustainable in its current form.

photo of Greg Moody
DAN KONIK / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

One of Gov. John Kasich’s top department chiefs has resigned.

Greg Moody, the man Kasich tapped to head a new health policy office he created, will be stepping down in a few days.

Moody will leave the governor’s Office of Health Transformation at the end of this month and begin an academic appointment at The Ohio State University Aug. 1. He’ll serve as Executive in Residence at the John Glenn College of Public Affairs.

photo of Richard Cordray
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The Democrat running for governor in November laid out his health care plan.

Former Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Chief Richard Cordray said his is three-part health care plan keeps Medicaid expansion intact, reduces costs and provides reliable coverage.

photo of Ohio Department of Medicaid
DAN KONIK / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The debate over how the major party candidates for governor feel about Medicaid expansion launched into an examination of exactly who are the 700,000 Ohioans in that expansion population and who are not included.

photo of Mike DeWine and Jon Husted
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Republican Gov. John Kasich and the Democrat who wants to replace him said Ohio needs to fight efforts to overturn the pre-existing conditions requirement for health insurers in the Affordable Care Act. Nearly 5 million Ohioans could be affected if that requirement were tossed out.

The Republican running for governor addressed the issue as well.

photo of Rich Cordray and Mike DeWine
DAN KONIK / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The Republican candidate for governor says he’s had a plan to keep Medicaid expansion for all 700,000 Ohioans covered under it. His Democratic opponent calls that a major about-face. And it shows there’s been a lot of confusion surrounding this key state policy and what either candidate will do with Medicaid expansion if he is elected.

photo of Mike DeWine and Jon Husted
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

For the first time, the Republican candidate for governor is stating clearly that he would keep Medicaid expansion for all 700,000 Ohioans covered under it. Mike DeWine says he’s been supportive all along, but his opponent says that’s not true.

While accepting the endorsement of the Ohio State Medical Association, DeWine said he’d keep Medicaid expansion but that he’d reform it, including adding work requirements and wellness incentive programs.

photo of Rich Cordray and Mike DeWine
DAN KONIK / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The Republican and the Democrat running for governor are laying out their plans for how to help children succeed. Both Mike DeWine and Rich Cordray say it all begins before the kids are even born. However Cordray sees one clear difference between his take and that of his opponent.

photo of Rich Cordray
TANA WEINGARTNER / WVXU

Democratic gubernatorial candidate Rich Cordray brought his campaign to Springfield and Cincinnati Monday. In Cincinnati he met with Hamilton County health-care professionals largely focused on reducing infant mortality.

"We have an infant-mortality crisis in the state of Ohio where we are one of the worst states in the nation and particularly bad in the African-American community for newborn babies dying at rates far exceeding the national average," he said.

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United States Fish and Wildlife Service

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, May 2:

Photo of John Kasich
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Gov. John Kasich has signed the new two-year $2.6 billion capital budget at the site of a planned mental and behavioral health hospital in Columbus. The hospital is one of the investments included in that spending plan. But Ohio Public Radio’s Jo Ingles reports, Kasich issued a warning of sorts, too.

Kasich said his decision to expand Medicaid has allowed many Ohioans to get addiction and mental health treatment. And he urged continuation of that program once he leaves office.

photo of Save Medicaid rally
DAN KONIK / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Medicaid expansion is one of Republican Gov. John Kasich’s signature accomplishments, but it’s likely to be gone if either his lieutenant governor or the attorney general is elected to replace him. And that would create a crisis for some 700,000 Ohioans in Medicaid expansion, most of whom are chronically ill or drug addicted. Statehouse correspondent Karen Kasler asked both Republicans about their plans.

photo of Ohio Department of Medicaid
DAN KONIK / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Ohio's GOP Legislature passed a budget last year that requires the state to apply for permission to impose work requirements on able-bodied Medicaid recipients. That could mean thousands of Ohioans could lose their health-care coverage.

General disagreement
Generally, conservatives and liberals disagree strongly over work requirements for Medicaid recipients.  From the right is Rea Hederman with the Buckeye Institute, which calls itself a free market think tank.

photo of Ohio House Chamber
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

This year’s biggest drama at the Ohio Statehouse centered around the ongoing struggles between Gov. John Kasich and the Republican-controlled Legislature. They culminated in a continuing battle over vetoes. 

Perhaps the most controversial item included in this year’s giant budget bill was a plan to freeze Medicaid enrollment for the expanded population.

photo of Mary Taylor
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Ohio’s Lieutenant Governor - who is running for the Republican nomination for governor next year - is pushing a plan to deal with opioids that some consider unusual, especially given her opposition to Medicaid expansion.

ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

For the first time since lawmakers required it in the budget, Gov. John Kasich’s administration made a trip to the Ohio Statehouse to ask a panel of legislators to release hundreds of millions of dollars to fund Medicaid

Leedco wind farm
WKSU / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Monday, October 30th:

A photo of John Kasich
ALLEGRA BOVERMAN / NHPR

Gov. John Kasich has been a regular guest on national news shows, talking about the importance of keeping Medicaid expansion in whatever changes are made to the Affordable Care Act.  Statehouse correspondent Karen Kasler talked to Kasich about the future of what's considered by some to be his signature achievement as governor.

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