Maumee River

a photo of governor Mike DeWine speaking
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Here are your morning headlines for Monday, April 15:

WKSU

A new investigation by two environmental groups cites unpermitted livestock farms as contributors to the algae problem in Lake Erie. The Environmental Working Group and Environmental Law & Policy Center collected and studied aerial photos of the Maumee River watershed.

Canadians Offer Plan to Battle Harmful Algae Blooms

Feb 27, 2018
photo of algae bloom in Maumee Bay State Park
ELIZABETH MILLER / GREAT LAKES TODAY

Canada and the province of Ontario recently released their plan to combat toxic algae blooms in Lake Erie.  Phosphorus is the primary cause of the blooms that turn parts of the lake green most summers.

The U.S. and Canada hope to reduce phosphorus in Lake Erie by 40 percent, from 2008 levels.  It’s all part of the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement.

This Year's Lake Erie Algae Bloom Rated "Severe"

Nov 8, 2017
photo of algae bloom in Maumee Bay State Park
ELIZABETH MILLER / GREAT LAKES TODAY

The 2017 algae bloom is over in western Lake Erie.  And while it didn’t directly threaten drinking water, its bright green hue prompted national attention and hurt Lake Erie’s tourism business.

Author Details Maumee River's Troubles and History in New Book

Nov 1, 2017
photo of In the Watershed cover
RYAN SCHNURR

The Maumee River runs more than 100 miles before emptying into Lake Erie in Ohio. And it carries a lot of the farm runoff that triggers algae blooms.

But a new book shows that there’s a lot more to the river. Ryan Schnurr spent a week walking and canoeing the length of the river last summer. He has turned that experience into a book called "In the Watershed."  It’s part memoir and part lesson on the Maumee’s place in history.

photo of the Maumee River
WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

The Maumee River could become Ohio’s next water trail thanks to a joint effort by the Metroparks of the Toledo Area and the Defiance Soil and Water Conservation District.

The two groups are applying to the Ohio Department of Natural Resources to develop the 108-mile river for recreational use.