Matt Bruning

photo of a wrong way sign
Ohio Department of Transportation

The Ohio Department of Transportation is testing new technology aimed at stopping wrong-way crashes on the highway. Signs and detectors are being installed along an 18-mile stretch of Interstate 71 near Cincinnati.

ODOT spokesman Matt Bruning said the goal is to prevent wrong-way crashes.

“While they are extremely rare, they are usually very serious crashes that happen. So we know they are 40 times more likely to be deadly than other types of crashes,” he said.

a photo of a field with Pollinator Project sign
SARAH TAYLOR / WKSU

If you drive Ohio highways you may have noticed more flowers and taller grass on the side of the road.

The Ohio Department of Transportation has begun planting wildflowers along highways across the state with the goal of creating habitats for pollinators.

Each site requires $400 to get started, but ODOT press secretary Matt Bruning said the project will save Ohio taxpayers millions.

“Just last year, we’ve already saved about $2.28 Million in just reducing our mowing of these areas, and that number’s going to continue to grow as we continue to expand these.”

Editor's note: This story first ran in April 2018. We are republishing it now because chances are you may see a sign while driving this holiday weekend that reads "Don't Drive Sauced, Leave It To The Cranberries," or "Visiting In-Laws? Slow Down Get There Late," or, on Black Friday, "Don't Discount Your Seatbelt." Their aim? To make you chuckle, yes, but also to drive safe. 

Glance at an electric overhead highway sign board this weekend in Ohio and you'll likely see an amusing message encouraging you not to text and drive.

"Texting and driving is not 'wreck-amended'" will run in honor of National Distracted Driving Month this April, though it won't be the first time the state's signs have gotten a little clever. 

photo of snow plow
OHIO DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

State road crews have been out in force since before the storm started Friday.

Ohio Department of Transportation spokesman Matt Bruning says 1,300 snow plows and 3,000 employees were out working on roads before and as the snow and ice storm began. He says this kind of storm is the most difficult for ODOT.