LGBTQ

LGBTQ pride flag
QUINN DOMBROWSKI / FLICKR/CREATIVE COMMONS

Here are your morning headlines for Tuesday, July 9: 

After nearly two decades in a basement, the LGBT Community Center of Greater Cleveland on Friday will officially be out in its new home.

The spacious 15,000 sq. ft, two-story building with lots of windows in the Gordon Square Arts District is a far cry from that basement.

The center will still offer outreach, education and training programs, as well as new programs taking advantage of more space and amenities like a state-of-the-art kitchen.

The center is for the LGBT community, but also for the greater community, Executive Director Phyllis Harris says.

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MATT RICHMOND / WCPN

Here are your morning headlines for Monday, June 3:

A photo of the Lyceum news conference
ALLIANCE DEFENDING FREEDOM

A conservative Christian organization and a Catholic school have dropped their lawsuit against an Ohio city for its law protecting against LGBTQ discrimination.

The Alliance Defending Freedom was representing the Lyceum School against South Euclid’s non-discrimination ordinance, which the school said might threaten its teachings on marriage and gender. The school had claimed there were First Amendment issues involved, but the city’s Keith Benjamin says this is a civil rights issue.

John R. Aylward Photography

Pop-rock duo DreamStates recently released its latest album, “Sad Bad Happy Good”. The 12-track release features multi-instrumentalist Natalie Grace Martin and creative designer Madeline Eckhart sharing vocals over original, rock-and-EDM-inspired beats. 

Photo of Mike DeWine
TY GREENLEES / DAYTON DAILY NEWS

Here are your morning headlines for Friday, April 12: 

ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Some Ohio legislators have been trying for years to add sexual orientation and gender identity or expression into the state’s anti-discrimination law. The bill, known as the “Ohio Fairness Act,” would make those additions a protected class in employment, housing and other public accommodations. 

Right now, a person in Ohio could be fired from their job, kicked out of their apartment, or refused service based on their sexual orientation, gender identity, or gender expression.  

BOB CHRISTY / KENT STATE UNIVERSITY

Kent State is remembering a pioneer in the campaign for LGBTQ rights.  The university has announced that Dolores Noll has died at the age of 88.

Picture of Michael Chanak Jr.
P&G

Michael Chanak Jr. is a gay rights activist who started working for Cincinnati-based Procter & Gamble (P&G) in the mid-1980s. He worked for years to get the company to add a clause to the equal employment opportunity (EEO) policy that protected the rights of gay people against discrimination at the workplace.

photo of early voters in Stark County
WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, October 17:

STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Backers of gender equality legislation that’s been proposed again in Ohio say they are making slow headway in getting the civil rights protection they think the bill would afford them.

Alana Jochum with Equality Ohio says civil rights protections for LGBTQ Ohioans are being passed in Ohio’s cities, including recently in Cleveland.

“We have gone from 14 percent of Ohioans from having access to a remedy to 27 percent.”  

JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The controversy over conservative federal judge Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation to a lifetime position on the U.S. Supreme Court has left many people wondering how the perceived shift in that bench will affect them. LGBTQ Ohioans are concerned.

Chad Griffin with the Human Rights Campaign says the message from his group to LGBTQ voters in Ohio is clear – put the brakes on the Trump administration now.

WKSU File Photo

Cuyahoga County council members will soon decide whether to approve legislation that adds legal protections for LGBTQ residents.

The legislation would add sexual orientation and gender identity to the county’s current anti-discrimination laws. If approved, it would be illegal to deny opportunities like housing and employment to Cuyahoga County residents in the LGBTQ community.

Communications Director Mary Louise Madigan says council members as well as County Executive Armond Budish introduced the legislation in June to promote inclusion and diversity in the county.

Hardin County Ohio farm
Ohio Farm Bureau website

Here are your morning headlines for Friday, July 20:

photo of Ohio House
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The House passed the hotly debated “Pastor Protection” Act Wednesday. Democratic lawmakers argued that the bill would create a way for businesses to discriminate against LGBTQ people.

Republican Nino Vitale has pushed for the “Pastor Protection” Act since the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in favor of same-sex marriage.

His bill would allow clergy to refuse to solemnize marriages based on religious beliefs.

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JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Vice President Mike Pence is set to visit Columbus Friday to tout the new federal tax reform plan, but there will be attention on something else outside the venue.

photo of Westlake Albert Einstein Academy
ALBERT EINSTEIN ACADEMIES OF OHIO

A charter school focused on LGBTQ students will be opening in Lakewood this fall.

Officials at Albert Einstein Academies of Ohio say they design their schools around the needs of the students who enroll. Recently, they’ve noticed an increase in the need for resources among LGBTQ students at their existing campuses in Westlake and Strongsville. Superintendent Bruce Thomas says the new high school will offer wrap-around services for students in Lakewood.

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COLUMBUS METROPOLITAN CLUB

A proposed Ohio law that would ban discrimination for LGBTQ people is seeing a new wave of support. Business groups say sexual orientation and gender identification should be considered protected classes in Ohio.

A coalition of hundreds of businesses is calling on lawmakers to pass the bill. They’re backed by chambers of commerce around the state.

photo of Nickie Antonio
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The bill to protect LGBTQ people from housing and employment discrimination is expected to take a big step as a committee prepares to hear from a major supporter, the Ohio Chamber of Commerce. The bill also seems to be getting support from the top House leader.

For the first time in nearly 10 years, the bill to protect people from discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender identity will get a second hearing.

Photo of Nickie Antonio
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

A Democratic  bill that would protect LGBTQ Ohioans from employment and housing discrimination has been floating around the Statehouse for more than 10 years, and has gonenowhere. Its backer weighed in on whether she thinks it's time to go to the ballot.

Democratic Rep. Nickie Antonio says adding the protections will make Ohio more attractive to people and businesses looking to move.

LGBTQ pride flag
QUINN DOMBROWSKI / FLICKR/CREATIVE COMMONS

Ohio is one of the nation’s leading states when it comes to equal treatment in the workplace in terms of sexual identity.

The Human Rights Campaign released its 2018 Corporate Equality Index, which looks at LGBTQ inclusion in major companies and law firms. 32 Ohio employers took part in the survey, getting an average score of 91 percent.

Deena Fidas, one of the study’s authors, says there are four specific criteria that go into determining an employer’s score.

photo of downtown Cleveland
WIKIPEDIA

Here are your morning headlines for Thursday, November 2nd:

Here are your morning headlines for Monday, October 23rd:

photo of Cleveland State University
FLICKR / FLICKR

The president of Cleveland State University is under fire for his response to fliers that were apparently put up by a hate group. The fliers, which were found last Thursday, target the LGBT community by suggesting they commit suicide.

photo of Jason Rudman
PHILIP DE OLIVEIRA / WKSU

A group of Ohio businesses is working together to promote nondiscrimination against LGBTQ employees. More than 200 businesses have signed on.

Ohio law says it’s illegal for businesses to fire employees based on things like race, religion, sex, or disability status "without just cause." But it is technically legal to fire someone for being gay or transgender.

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