Kenyon College

A photo of rings from a neutron star's flare.
NASA / WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Scientists have spent centuries studying how matter works. They’ve boiled it, they’ve frozen it, and they’ve even thrown it into particle colliders and smashed it up. They’ve learned a lot about what matter does in these conditions, but--that’s just what we can do on Earth.

“A neutron star is basically the densest object aside from a black hole. When they collide, the matter itself is deformed in such a way that we can probe densities inaccessible to laboratories on Earth,” Leslie Wade said.

photo of Jay Corrigan
JEFF ST.CLAIR / WKSU

How do you measure the value of something that’s free?

It’s a challenge for economists who study the economic impact of the Internet revolution.

In this week’s Exploradio, we look  at research that puts a price on your network of virtual friends.

How much would someone need to pay you for you to stop using Facebook?

CALTECH/MIT/LIGO LAB

In 1916, Einstein made a bold prediction-- that gravity actually travels in waves. These “gravitational waves” would be ripples in the fabric of space a bit like ripples on a pond, and would slightly stretch and squash the distances between things as they passed. 

photo of Case Western Reserve University
CASE WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY

As GOP Senators revealed their tax reform plan in Washington today, members of the House Ways and Means committee moved forward with amendments to their version of the bill. The House plan includes at least one provision that has university presidents up in arms.

The House GOP tax reform bill released last week would place a 1.4 percent tax on the endowments of private colleges and universities. On Thursday, a House committee approved an amendment to the bill that expands the tax beyond the universities themselves to affiliated non-profit organizations.

photo of Ohio State Fair
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Here are your morning headlines for Monday, September 18th: