Joe Biden

Pictures of people at political rallies in Ohio recently have shown most of them unmasked, in large crowds. The state’s mask mandate has gone unenforced at those events. 

Former Vice President Joe Biden has begun making a few cautious forays back onto the campaign trail. But generally, even as President Donald Trump stumps around the country, Biden is remaining close to his Delaware home as the pandemic has forced him into a kind of virtual front-porch campaign. You have to go back more than a century for the last time two candidates brought such different approaches to campaigning. 

Updated at 2:04 p.m. ET

Friday marks the 19th anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks against the United States — the single deadliest instance of a terrorist attack in world history and among the most consequential global policy markers in modern times.

The 2020 presidential campaign heads into the fall stretch with a dizzying pace of news developments threatening to upend the contest. But NPR interviews with voters across the country around Labor Day weekend found that most are locked into their support for either President Trump or Democratic nominee Joe Biden. The small contingent of undecided voters said they are unenthusiastic about their choices.

Ohio didn’t experience the blue wave that many other states did in 2018. And with President Trump winning Ohio by eight points in 2016, some pundits say Ohio is no longer a swing state. But the chairman of the Democratic National Committee says the Buckeye State is important this year. 

A photo of Larry Householder.
DAN KONIK / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, September 2:

Labor Day marks the point when campaigns ramp up visits to states. The itineraries for in-person campaigning haven’t been finalized yet. Republican President Donald Trump has been to various parts of Ohio a few times this summer. Democrat Joe Biden’s hasn’t been campaigning much in person anywhere but he’s expected to start doing more of that soon. 

Supporters for President Donald Trump are canvassing Ohio during the Republican National Convention, trying to rally support for November's election. Although 2020 has been upended by the coronavirus pandemic, the Republican party says a main message is the impact Trump has had on the economy.

Author David Giffels spent a year traveling around Ohio with the idea that by getting a better understanding of Ohio, he might get a better understanding of the nation as a whole this election year. The people he encountered in his journeys and what he learned from them are in his new book, "Barnstorming Ohio: To Understand America." Giffels said he wrapped up his research just as the coronavirus pandemic shut down the state and the country. 

A photo of the RNC stage.
ELIZABETH MILLER / IDEASTREAM

Editor's note:  This story has been updated.  The Republican National Convention starts tonight. And for the first time ever, due to the pandemic, it’s virtual.  John Green, director emeritus of the Bliss Institute of Applied Politics at the University of Akron, discusses how Republicans will use this convention to gain momentum heading into November’s elections. 

Democrats have to be very happy with what they were able to accomplish this week with their convention.

Their production of the first all-virtual convention went off mostly without a hitch. At times, the last night seemed like whiplash with a serious segment on faith and forgiveness followed by snark from emcee Julia Louis-Dreyfus, for example.

DNC Live Coverage: Thursday, Aug. 20

Aug 20, 2020

Follow live updates and analysis of the Democratic National Convention. Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden is speaking Thursday night.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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Photo of Goodyear's IntelliGrip concept tire
GOODYEAR TIRE AND RUBBER COMPANY

The third day of the Democratic National Convention for Ohio Democrats has been partially fueled by a tweet from President Trump calling for a boycott of Goodyear Tires over the Ohio-based company's ban on employees wearing political attire, which includes MAGA hats. 

Ohio Democrats fired back calling the president's actions "despicable." 

Several state leaders from the Democratic party slammed Trump's tweet urging people to boycott the Akron-based company.

photo of Kathleen Clyde
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

John Kasich has been getting a lot of attention as a speaker at the Democratic National Convention this week. But there’s another Ohioan who has a starring role as well.

Portage County Commissioner Kathleen Clyde is one of 17 Democrats designated as rising stars who will deliver a joint keynote speech Tuesday night.

Clyde served eight years as a State Representative and narrowly lost a bid for Secretary of State in 2018. 

DNC
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU

The Democratic National Convention gets underway today. However, the usual mix of in-person pomp and circumstance and politics is being replaced by a virtual four-day event due to the pandemic. One of those who was supposed to be there watching everything that's going on was Dave Cohen, interim director of the Bliss Institute of Applied Politics at the University Akron, but, remotely, he’s still keeping tabs on what’s going on. 

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Democrat Joe Biden's lead has expanded to double-digits against President Trump in the presidential election, an NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll finds. Biden now leads Trump 53% to 42%, up from an 8-point advantage at the end of June.

The change comes as 71% of Americans now see the coronavirus as a real threat, up significantly over the last several months, as more than 167,000 Americans have died and more than 5 million have become infected with the virus, as of Friday.

Updated at 7:38 p.m. ET

Presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden and his newly named running mate, Sen. Kamala Harris of California, made their first joint appearance Wednesday following Biden's announcement of the selection a day earlier.

Updated at 7 p.m. ET

Former Vice President Joe Biden, the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee, has picked Sen. Kamala Harris of California as his running mate.

The selection will make Harris the third woman and first Black and first Asian American candidate to be nominated for vice president by a major political party.

When you’re a down-ballot candidate — that is, someone not named Joe Biden or Donald Trump — you might spend the summer reintroducing yourself to members of the local Democratic or Republican clubs.

This year, you’ll have to make sure you’re not on mute.

Cleveland’s Ward 17 Democratic Club has been meeting on Zoom, broadcasting the video on Facebook to neighbors who otherwise would be meeting in person. Last month, the club laid out plans to get out the vote remotely.  

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It's hard to believe that the hole President Trump dug for himself could get deeper, but it has.

screenshot of interactive county polling map of Ohio
YOUR VOICE OHIO

A new poll that shows President Donald Trump trailing former Vice President Joe Biden in Ohio also reveals that Mr. Biden’s “strong” supporters here outnumber Mr. Trump’s, a snapshot of the state less than 100 days from an election that will determine whether Ohio continues its unmatched swing-state streak.

Voters Express Hopes, Worries Ahead of 2020 Presidential Election

Aug 2, 2020
Your Voice Ohio logo
YOUR VOICE OHIO

Just months before Election Day, voters of all stripes in Ohio are at the same time both worried and hopeful.

They’re not sure who to trust in the media and government. They’re concerned about economic security for themselves and fellow Americans. They aren’t sure how the election will go down during a pandemic. They want honest leaders to come up with more fixes to serious problems.

Picture of HEC sign.
CASE WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY

Here are your morning headlines for Tuesday, July 28:

The University of Notre Dame will no longer host the first presidential debate on September 29, citing "constraints" brought on by the coronavirus pandemic.

"The necessary health precautions would have greatly diminished the educational value of hosting the debate on our campus," University President Reverend John I. Jenkins announced Monday.

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