Holden Arboretum

a photo of a leaf with beech leaf disease
JEFF ST.CLAIR / WKSU

A mysterious disease is killing one of the most majestic trees in American forests, the beech. 

Known for its smooth gray bark, the beech is an important anchor species. 

No one knows exactly what causes Beech Leaf Disease, but a team of tree scientists is narrowing down the list of culprits in this botanical whodunit.

a photo of the natural history museum
ANDREW MEYER / WKSU

A new collaboration between four science organizations in Cleveland will give students greater research opportunities.

The Holden Aboretum, The Cleveland Museum of Natural History, and the Cleveland Metroparks Zoo have signed affiliation agreements with Case Western Reserve University’s biology department.

Ohio Bans Sale of 38 Invasive Plant Species

Jan 8, 2018
photo of Japanese honeysuckle
OHIO DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES

Plant experts and conservationists are applauding Ohio’s move to stop the spread of some invasive plant species. The state is prohibiting the sale of 38 plants, including several varieties of honeysuckles and shrubs, as well as Bradford pear trees.

Roger Gettig is vice president of horticulture and conservation at Holden Arboretum in Kirtland.

beech tree nut
VIVIAN GOODMAN / WKSU

Researchers say they are stumped by a disease that’s infecting beech trees in Northeast Ohio.

Beech leaf disease can be identified by curling leaves with dark stripes. The leaves fall earlier than normal and prevents the tree from blooming the next season.

Mike Watson, conservation biologist at Holden Arboretum, says the cause of the disease and how it spreads is unknown.