Hillary Clinton

Bernie Sanders in Akron
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU

Hillary Clinton’s surrogates hit Ohio in a big way this weekend. They included Bernie Sanders, who appeared on campuses in Akron and Kent to make the case for his primary supporters to embrace Clinton. WKSU’s M.L. Schultze has more on that message, and how it was received.

At the University of Akron, it wasn’t the thousands Sen. Sanders often drew during his Democratic primary rallies. In fact, it felt more like a college lecture, with Sanders asking the audience questions about things like oligarchs, Supreme Court decisions and wealth inequality.

Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren and Chelsea Clinton are canvassing Ohio to try to boost voter turnout among millennials and the liberal wing of the Democratic Party.

Chelsea Clinton was in Dayton and Westerville today and plans to return Thursday with a campaign stop in Toledo.

Vermont Sen. Sanders – who challenged Clinton from the left in the Democratic primary – will be at college campuses in Kent and Akron and at an organizing event in Canton on Saturday. He’ll be urging new voters to register by the Oct. 11 deadline.  

trump shirts
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU

  Donald Trump’s trip last night to Canton began with a quick tour of the Pro Football Hall of Fame and ended with a pledge at the Canton Memorial Civic Center to be a great president for all Americans. But as WKSU’s M.L. Schultze reports for Ohio Public Radio, he at times seemed more focused on Flint, Michigan, than Canton, Ohio.

Trump chose not to finish his speech earlier in Flint after the pastor of the church there interrupted his attack on Hillary Clinton, telling Trump this was not supposed to be a political speech.

KYLE KONDIK
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU

It’s after Labor Day, which means pollsters have turned from measuring overall sentiment of voters toward trying to figure out which voters are most likely to actually cast ballots. 

Three polls of Ohio’s voters over the last couple weeks have shown Hillary Clinton up, Clinton and Donald Trump tied, and Trump besting Clinton.

photo of Ted Strickland with campaign volunteers
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Former Governor and U.S. Senate candidate Ted Strickland says he’s been on the campaign trail lately with Democratic Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton as he tries to unseat incumbent Republican Sen. Rob Portman. Strickland says he hasn’t noticed any problems with Clinton’s health.

photo of Ted Strickland
APRIL LAISSLE / WYSO

Democratic Presidential Nominee Hillary Clinton’s health became a major focal point during running mate Tim Kaine’s visit to Dayton Monday.

The major topic of the rally at Stivers School for the Arts was set to be college affordability, but that changed during Former Governor Ted Strickland’s introduction speech. 

“Just let me say that I’ve known Senator Kaine for quite some time. He is a wonderfully prepared person to be the Vice President and to be the President, if that ever became necessary.”

photo of Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Democratic vice presidential running mate Tim Kaine campaigned in Dayton today / Monday. With a month until early voting begins, the campaigns are planning another week of Ohio visits. 

Tim Kaine spoke at Stivers School for the Arts, a magnet school in Dayton. He had been planning an event in Northeast Ohio Tuesday, but the Clinton campaign said that has been postponed. Instead, Kaine will travel to Michigan.

Republican nominee Donald Trump will be back in Ohio this week for a Wednesday night rally in Canton. He attended a fundraiser there about a month ago.

Ohio Voters Measure the Presidential Candidates by Their Response to Terrorism

Sep 11, 2016
photo of Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

You’re far more likely to die in a traffic accident than ina terrorist attack in Ohio. But arecent poll shows terrorism ranks among the top four concerns for Ohioans, while car accidents received no mention.

Fifteen years after the Sept. 11 attacks in New York, terrorism still shapes how people think and view the two major candidates for president.

Gen. Johnnie Wilson
WIKIPEDIA

A four-star general from Lorain is among the retired officers who have been making the case for and against Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump this week. WKSU’s M.L. Schultze reports.

Gen. Johnnie Wilson is among the 95 generals and admirals who are campaigning for Clinton – going up against the 88 backing Trump. Wilson acknowledges a political role for military retirees is a relatively recent development.

a photo of vote buttons
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU

The latest Quinnipiac poll shows the Libertarian candidate could swing Ohio’s presidential election Donald Trump’s way. For Ohio Public Radio, WKSU’s ML. Schultze has more from the first measure of Ohio voters as the presidential race enters its final leg.

photo of Hillary Clinton and Tim Kaine
NICK CASTELE / WCPN

The Democratic and Republican presidential nominees both made stops in Northeast Ohio on Labor Day with their running mates. Hillary Clinton held a rally in Cleveland, and Donald Trump spoke at a roundtable in Brook Park. 

Hillary Clinton and running mate Tim Kaine took the stage at Luke Easter Park on Cleveland’s east side Monday afternoon.

Clinton criticized Donald Trump throughout their remarks, speaking in a hoarse voice after a bout of coughing.

Hillary Clinton Plans Labor Day Stop in Cleveland

Sep 5, 2016
Hillary Clinton in Cleveland
MARK URYCKI / WCPN

Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton and running mate Tim Kaine will campaign in Cleveland today. 

Clinton and Kaine plan to hold a rally this afternoon at Luke Easter Park, on the southeast side of Cleveland.  They’ll speak at the end of the 11th Congressional District Caucus’ Labor Day parade. The yearly event typically draws numerous local elected officials and candidates.  Kaine is set to speak earlier in the day in Pittsburgh, and Clinton plans a rally in Illinois later in the afternoon.

The Choice Between Trump and Clinton Drives the 'Unpopular' Vote

Sep 4, 2016
photo of Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

When Ohioans begin voting next month for the highest office in the land, hundreds of thousands of them will hold their noses and check the box for a candidate they don’t like, don’t trust and don’t respect.

A poll conducted for Your Vote Ohio, a consortium of Ohio news organizations, including this one, found the candidates have reached a level of unpopularity that may be unprecedented in the history of American politics.

photo of Donald Trump
TANA WEINGARTNER / OHIO PUBLIC RADIO

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump stood before thousands of people this morning at the American Legion convention in Cincinnati, promising to reform the Department of Veterans Affairs.

“It’s in very sad shape.  I deal with veterans all the time – we have tremendous veteran support – and the stories I hear are so sad.  We’re not going to have that anymore.”

Photo of Hillary Clinton campaigning in Cleveland
MARK URYCKI / OHIO PUBLIC RADIO

Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton told a room full of veterans that American leadership means standing with allies. 

In Clinton's address to the national convention of the American Legion, the former secretary of state stressed the importance of alliances.

"Threatening to walk away from our alliances, ignoring the importance that they still are to us, is not only wrong, it's dangerous."

AFL-CIO press conference
M.L. SCHULTZE / mls332WKSU

Vice President Joe Biden will be in Warren and Parma tomorrow, stumping for Hillary Clinton – whom he had briefly considered challenging in the Democratic primary. WKSU’s M.L. Schultze has more on appearances with autoworkers in which Biden is expected to directly tackle Donald Trump. 

Biden campaigned in the Mahoning Valley a half dozen times during the presidential races of 2008 and 2012. Jaladah Aslam, a union retiree who now is a labor and political consultant, says the vice president knows the valley at a more intuitive level as well.

photo of Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Ohio continues to be the center of attention for both major party presidential candidates.

Hillary Clinton and her running mate, Tim Kaine, will be in Cleveland on Labor Day. They'll be participating in Labor Day festival in Luke Easter Park on Kinsman Road.

It's Clinton's second visit to Cleveland in a little over two weeks, and her third to Northeast Ohio since she wrapped up the Democratic nomination at the end of July. It also comes four days after Vice President Joe Biden will be joining labor unions at events in Parma and Warren.

Union supporting Clinton
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU

A group of state labor leaders backing Hillary Clinton is stumping around the state, including in the Youngstown, where Donald Trump is hoping to attract disaffected union members and other Democrats. 

Leaders of Ohio’s labor coalition, the AFL-CIO, and individual unions appeared in Cleveland and Youngstown to underscore their message that Hillary Clinton has the plan to rejuvenate the working class and that Donald Trump is a hypocrite.

Trump Rally in Akron
Tim Rudell / WKSU

Donald Trump 's rally at the James A. Rhodes arena at the University of Akronactually got going about an hour earlier than scheduled -- a sign, he says, of the excitement surrounding his campaign.

“There’s something going on,” Donald Trump said as he took the stage at the James A. Rhodes Arena oat the University of Akron well in advance of the scheduled start of his campaign address. “The seats are full,” he noted. “Why wait?” 

photo of Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

This weekend will bring a new barrage of TV ads in Ohio and other battleground states – including the first spots from Republican Donald Trump. 

Trump’s first ad contrasts his view of what the US will be like under a Hillary Clinton administration with his plans on what appear to be his favorite issues – the border with Mexico, immigration and national security.

Trump in Youngstown
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU

  

  While the national campaign for Donald Trump is going through another shakeup, his Ohio campaign is settling in. It’s announced the opening of 16 campaign offices around the state and is promising many more. And it’s added senior staff to work with State Director Bob Paduchik. WKSU’s M.L. Schultze talked with Paduchik, who headed up George Bush’s 2000 Ohio campaign and moved over to the Trump campaign in June.

Clinton rally
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU

Hillary Clinton spent a half hour focusing on economics and Donald Trump in her second visit to Northeast Ohio in about as many weeks. WKSU’s M.L. Schultze reports on a speech delivered in West Park, one of Cleveland’s changing neighborhoods.

  Clinton spoke in the gleaming new John Marshall High School to about 2,300 people. She called the school a symbol of the difference government investment can make to boost the middle class.

Trump at YSU
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU

Donald Trump’s trip to Youngstown yesterday (Monday) differed in style from most of his other presidential stump speeches along the Ohio/Pennsylvania border. What did not change, as WKSU’s M.L. Schultze reports, was his call to slow immigration, the passion of his supporters – and the dearth of Ohio’s political leaders on stage with him.

Trump billed the speech as a major foreign policy address. And it was clear from the get-go that there would be no riffing by the candidate on building a wall with Mexico – though that’s often his biggest applause line.

Hillary Clinton in Cleveland
MARK URYCKI / WCPN

The first Quinnipiac poll featuring people who are likely to vote is out – and it shows good news for one of the two major party presidential candidates. There’s also important information for the leading minor party candidates too.

Your Vote Ohio Logo
YOUR VOTE OHIO

“There, I played the race card,” said a woman who smacked the table then backed her chair away.

She was among 20 people at the Beacon Journal several nights ago discussing politics and news media, eating pizza and awaiting Hillary Clinton’s acceptance speech.

“What if the things said by Donald Trump were coming from a black man?” she asked. He would have no chance of becoming a candidate, let alone president, she insisted.

Race not only haunts this election, but is at its core, she said.

But can we trust Clinton, others asked.

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