heartbeat bill

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DAN KONIK / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, August 21:

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STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

A new Quinnipiac University poll shows a majority of Ohioans support background checks for gun sales, favor legalized abortion, and oppose one of the most recent state restrictions on abortion.

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JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Ohio is operating on a budget extension since lawmakers failed to pass a new two-year state budget by the constitutionally mandated June 30 deadline. Some Democrats are questioning whether time that was spent on a controversial abortion law, recently put on hold by a federal court, could have been used better hammering out details of the state budget.

Democratic State Rep. Richard Brown said Republicans have control over the legislative and executive branch. So he thinks it’s ridiculous the budget wasn’t passed on time.

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TIM RUDELL / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Thursday, July 4:

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JO INGLES / OHIO PUBLIC RADIO

A federal court has blocked a highly controversial abortion ban from taking effect. The so called “Heartbeat Bill” law was set to take effect next week.

The law would have prevented doctors from performing abortions at the point a fetal heartbeat is detected. That could be as early as six weeks into a pregnancy. Many women don’t know they are pregnant by that point.

A photo of the ACLU announcing their lawsuit over Ohio's lawsuit
SAM ABERLE / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

More than a month after Gov. Mike DeWine signed one of the most restrictive abortion bans in the country, a lawsuit has been filed in federal court to stop it from taking effect in July. It bans abortion as early as six weeks into a pregnancy.

The bill bans abortion after a fetal heartbeat can be detected, often before a woman would even know she was pregnant. Jessie Hill, an attorney working with the ACLU, said the so-called “heartbeat bill” is blatantly unconstitutional.

ACLU Sues Ohio To Block 'Heartbeat' Abortion Ban

May 15, 2019

ACLU of Ohio filed a federal lawsuit Wednesday challenging Ohio’s recent “heartbeat” abortion ban, which was signed into law last month.

JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

When Gov. Mike DeWine signed the controversial bill into law that bans abortion after a fetal heartbeat is detected, the woman who launched the first version of it in Ohio in 2011 and fought for it till it passed wasn’t there. 

Faith 2 Action’s Janet Folger Porter clamored for passage of the legislation known as the Heartbeat Bill for eight years, during which time former Gov. John Kasich vetoed it twice. She was excited when lawmakers passed it a third time.

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WIKIPEDIA

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, April 17: 

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ELVIRA KONEVA / SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

Ohio’s new law that bans abortion after a fetal heartbeat is detected is supposed to go into effect in three months. But there’s a very good chance it won’t. There’s a legal challenge looming.

The ACLU of Ohio’s Legal Director, Freda Levenson, says the new ban criminalizes almost all abortions in the state. 

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TY GREENLEES / DAYTON DAILY NEWS

Here are your morning headlines for Friday, April 12: 

The six-week abortion ban known as the “Heartbeat Bill” is now law in Ohio.

Gov. Mike DeWine signed the bill Thursday afternoon, just one day after it passed the Republican-led General Assembly. The law is slated to take effect in 90 days, unless blocked by a federal judge.

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GOODYEAR

Here are your morning headlines for Thursday, April 11:

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JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

A controversial bill that bans abortion from the point a fetal heartbeat is detected has passed the Ohio House and Senate. This marks the third time state lawmakers have passed what’s been called the “Heartbeat Bill.” But this time will likely be the last because Gov. Mike DeWine says he’ll sign it into law.

Opponents of the bill, which bans abortions around six weeks, gathered outside the House chamber even before the debate started inside.

Then one by one, lawmakers spoke out. Some Democrats shared their personal stories of unplanned pregnancies or abortion.

Over protests from Democrats and pro-choice advocates, the Ohio General Assembly on Wednesday passed a more restrictive version of the "Heartbeat Bill."

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GOOGLE MAPS

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, April 10:

JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The full Ohio House is set to vote Wednesday on a ban on abortion as early as six weeks into a pregnancy. It's been renamed the "Human Rights Protection Act" but has commonly been known as the Heartbeat Bill over the five times lawmakers have considered it. 

There was debate over whether to hear testimony on the bill, but in the end, it was allowed. Most who spoke testified against it. Kimberly Inez Maguire asked the committee to put themselves in the shoes of a woman facing an unplanned or difficult pregnancy.

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Statehouse News Bureau

An Ohio House committee is set to hear a bill Tuesday that would ban elective abortions as early as six weeks into pregnancy. Opponents of that legislation are concerned about changes in what legislators have been referring to as the "Heartbeat Bill."

The bill was renamed the “Human Rights Protection Act" by the Senate. And NARAL Pro Choice Ohio’s Jaime Miracle said doctors, nurses and others are upset about recent changes to it.

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ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

 An Ohio House committee has received a new version of the so-called Heartbeat Bill, an abortion ban that could happen as early as six weeks into a pregnancy. And it is raising questions by at least one lawmaker on that committee.  

 

“I mean this is insane.”

 

Democratic Representative Janine Boyd (D-Cleveland Hts.) said the newer version of the Heartbeat Bill changes language to protect the health of the fetus over the health of the woman.

 

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ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Here are your morning headlines for Thursday, March 14: 

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KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The Ohio Senate has passed the so-called “Heartbeat Bill” which bans an abortion when a viable heartbeat is detected, which can be as early as six weeks. Republican leaders expect a possible legal challenge.

Pro-choice groups have said if the “Heartbeat Bill” is signed into law, they plan to challenge it in court. This would likely result in a pricey court battle that could go all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court.

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JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, March 13:

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THE OHIO CHANNEL

A southwest Ohio man has settled a lawsuit he filed against his Republican state senator, who he says blocked him on Facebook during a heated debate about the veto on the Heartbeat Bill abortion ban in December. 

Sen. Joe Uecker had posted he was disappointed the veto wouldn’t be overturned, and his constituent Anthony Fambry of Batavia posted that the Heartbeat Bill was unconstitutional. Uecker fired back that Fambry needed to lose his emotions, and Fambry says he was blocked and his comments erased.

A photo of Governor Mike DeWine.
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Lawmakers are, once again, debating the contentious so called “Heartbeat Bill,” which would ban abortions at about six weeks when a fetal heartbeat can be detected. The bill was vetoed twice by former Gov. John Kasich, but now Gov. Mike DeWine says he’ll sign it. But one political strategist is floating another idea.

Democratic strategist Dale Butland says Republican lawmakers should put the bill on the statewide ballot to let voters decide.

photo of Heartbeat Bill protestors
JO INGLES / OHIO PUBLIC RADIO

Almost eight years to the day that it was first proposed, the so-called "Heartbeat Bill" abortion ban has been introduced at the Statehouse again. This time, there's a possible new strategy for a bill that’s been vetoed twice but this time has the support of the governor.

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